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Expertise: Turkey, climate migration security, food security, defense policy

Max Hoffman is the Associate Director for the National Security and International Policy team at American Progress, focusing on Turkey and the Kurdish regions, U.S. defense budgeting and policy, and the intersection of climate change, human migration, and security concerns. He has organized and undertaken repeated research trips to Turkey, Iraq, Lebanon, Germany, and India.

Prior to joining American Progress, Hoffman worked on disarmament and security issues for the United Nations, interned for the U.S. House of Representatives Armed Services Committee, and worked in public affairs in Boston. Hoffman has been published in a range of academic and news outlets, including The New York Times, Foreign Policy, and Politico, and has appeared on TV and radio programs to discuss his work. Hoffman received his M.A. in history from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, where he won the Compton Prize for American History for his dissertation on the U.S. role in the Cuban Revolution of 1933. A native of the U.S. Virgin Islands, Hoffman has studied military history and Spanish in Oxford, United Kingdom and Salamanca, Spain and traveled extensively in Europe and the Middle East.

By Max Hoffman
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The Process Behind Turkey’s Proposed Extradition of Fethullah GülenCenter for American ProgressSeptember 7, 2016
Turkey 2023: Four Profiles of Modern TurkeyCenter for American ProgressJuly 20, 2016
Turkey’s Digital DividesCenter for American ProgressJune 27, 2016
Europe’s twenty-first century challenge: climate change, migration and securityPublishing House SpringerApril 12, 2016
The Unpaid Kurdish Peshmerga’s Offensive Against ISISBackground BriefingNovember 13, 2015
Focusing on the Drivers of Conflict and InstabilityFood Chain ReactionNovember 8, 2015
Turkey’s Right Rises AgainCenter for American ProgressNovember 3, 2015
Turkey’s President Erdogan’s Cynical Power PlayBackground Briefing with Ian MastersAugust 20, 2015
Turkey Should Welcome Kurdish Gains in Northern SyriaCenter for American ProgressJune 24, 2015
Climate Change, Migration, and the Demand for Greater Resources: Challenges and ResponsesThe SAIS Review of International AffairsJune 19, 2015
Previewing Turkey’s General ElectionCenter for American ProgressJune 2, 2015
Cause behind African migrant flood has terrifying implications for the worldReutersApril 21, 2015
The U.S.-Turkey PartnershipCenter for American ProgressMarch 12, 2015
How ISIS Could Soon Control Close to Half of the Syrian Border with TurkeyThe National InterestOctober 7, 2014
The United States, Turkey, and the Kurdish RegionsCenter for American ProgressJuly 31, 2014
Hagel’s Defense Cuts: A Good IdeaThe National InterestMay 1, 2014
A User’s Guide to the Fiscal Year 2015 Defense BudgetCenter for American ProgressApril 24, 2014
Turkey in TurmoilCenter for American ProgressMarch 27, 2014
Defense Budget Proposal Postpones Key ChoicesCenter for American ProgressFebruary 25, 2014
For the Pentagon, Diminished Sequester Still Looms Under Congressional Budget DealCenter for American ProgressDecember 12, 2013
Remembering Rep. Ike Skelton of MissouriCenter for American ProgressOctober 29, 2013
Mission creep: A short historyPoliticoSeptember 5, 2013
Erdoğan Aims to Distract with His Latest Remarks Against IsraelCenter for American ProgressAugust 23, 2013
Guinea-Bissau and the South Atlantic Cocaine TradeCenter for American ProgressAugust 22, 2013
Liberal Turkey Speaks—Is Prime Minister Erdoğan Listening?Center for American ProgressJune 4, 2013
Freedom of the Press and Expression in TurkeyCenter for American ProgressMay 14, 2013
The Pentagon Must Carry Its WeightCenter for American ProgressApril 11, 2013
Climate Change, Migration, and Conflict in the Amazon and the AndesCenter for American ProgressFebruary 26, 2013
U.S. Can Afford $500 Billion in (Smart) Defense CutsCNNMoneyFebruary 4, 2013
Barack Obama’s Historic Transformation of the American MilitaryThe GrioJanuary 28, 2013
How to Cut $100B from the Defense BudgetPoliticoDecember 17, 2012
$100 Billion in Politically Feasible Defense Cuts for a Budget DealCenter for American ProgressDecember 6, 2012
What’s $2 Trillion Among Friends?Foreign PolicyAugust 21, 2012
Gunpoint StimulusForeign PolicyJuly 2, 2012
Military Health Care: Facing the FactsThe National InterestJune 7, 2012
What’s Next for NATO?Center for American ProgressMay 17, 2012
The Top 10 Things to Know About Military CompensationCenter for American ProgressMay 11, 2012
Reforming Military CompensationCenter for American ProgressMay 7, 2012
VFW, Allies Mislead on Pay, BenefitsCenter for American ProgressMay 7, 2012
Protecting Wasteful Military Spending at All CostsCenter for American ProgressApril 18, 2012
New Ryan Plan Hurts U.S. Foreign PolicyCenter for American ProgressMarch 22, 2012
The Fiscal Year 2013 Defense Budget: A Report CardCenter for American ProgressFebruary 13, 2012
Panetta’s Trimmed Defense Budget Is a Good First Step—but It Isn’t EnoughCenter for American ProgressJanuary 27, 2012