Departments

National Security and International Policy

Advancing progressive national security policies that are grounded in respect for democratic values: accountability, rule of law, and human rights.

Representatives of the U.N. Security Council members raise their hands to vote in favor of a draft resolution at the U.N. headquarters in New York, September 30, 2021. (Loey Felipe/UN Photo/Handout via Xinhua)

What We're Doing

Defending democracy

Democracies around the globe—including our own—face threats not seen in generations. We work to bolster the guardrails of democracy around the world, strengthening the rule of law and accountability, and in so doing, we add our voice to the chorus pushing against authoritarian forms of government.

Revitalizing diplomacy

The United States’ most enduring advantage is our network of alliances. Alliances and relationships are increasingly important components of U.S. national power, furthering economic, security, and humanitarian aims. We develop and support approaches for revitalizing diplomacy to further U.S. engagement in improving lives at home and around the world.

Putting climate at the center of U.S. foreign policy

Climate change threatens global security, stability, and humanity, bringing sweeping changes to our world. We are working to center climate in our international efforts and policies by transforming strategy, culture, and budgets; outlining collective responses; and defining new bilateral and multilateral alliances that can advance collective solutions to these urgent problems confronting the country and the world.

Redefining American security in today’s threat environment

Many of today’s most foreseeable threats are those that affect daily life and prospects for prosperity: COVID-19, climate change, systemic inequality, racism, and global disinformation aimed at undermining rights and democratic practices. We are working to reconceptualize what national security means in the 21st century and how U.S. national security institutions and foreign policy priorities can adapt to protect Americans and safeguard human security for all.

The National Security and International Policy department advances progressive national security policies that are grounded in respect for democratic values: accountability, rule of law, and human rights.

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Featured work

Latest

Lula’s Presidential Victory Is an Opportunity To Renew U.S.-Brazil Climate Cooperation Article

Lula’s Presidential Victory Is an Opportunity To Renew U.S.-Brazil Climate Cooperation

Following the election of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva to Brazil’s presidency—and the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act marking the largest climate investment in U.S. history—a moment of truth for climate emerges for the most populous countries in the Americas right as leaders gather for COP27 in Egypt.

Ryan Richards, Joel Martinez, Frances Colón

It’s time to close Guantanamo In the News

It’s time to close Guantanamo

Elisa Massimino argues for the closure of the U.S. prison in Guantanamo, which, she writes, has become "a moral, legal, strategic, and financial sinkhole for our country."

Elisa Massimino

A Conversation With Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall Past Event

A Conversation With Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall

Discussing Air Force and Space Force personnel, the crisis in Ukraine, competition with China, human rights, and the role of the U.S. in the world

Focus Assistance to Tunisia—Don’t Suspend It In the News

Focus Assistance to Tunisia—Don’t Suspend It

Gordon Gray argues that the United States should continue assistance programs that will further its core interests—security and democracy—rather than cutting off assistance to Tunisia following President Kais Saied’s anti-democratic power grab this past summer.

Gordon Gray

The Case for Reducing Defense Spending In the News

The Case for Reducing Defense Spending

Larry Korb argues that the Biden administration must reduce the U.S. defense budget without jeopardizing national security by canceling tactical nuclear weapons; retiring irrelevant and old Navy ships; and slowing the production of F-35 fighter jets.

Lawrence J. Korb

The FBI’s Mar-a-Lago Papers Search Fact Sheet
The Mar-a-Lago resort is seen against a stormy gray cloud with an American flag in front.

The FBI’s Mar-a-Lago Papers Search

Former President Trump didn’t just abscond with classified material he wasn’t allowed to have; he may have gravely harmed U.S. national security at the same time.

Alan Yu, Peter Juul

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