Expertise: Housing and consumer finance

Michela Zonta is a senior policy analyst for Housing and Consumer Finance Policy at American Progress. She has extensive research, teaching, and consulting experience in housing and community development. She has published work on the mortgage-lending practices of ethnic-owned banks in immigrant communities, jobs-housing imbalance in minority communities, residential segregation, and poverty and housing affordability. Prior to joining American Progress, Zonta taught urban and regional planning in the Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), where she delivered several graduate courses on housing policy, community development, geographic information systems, British housing policy, and race and gender. While at VCU, she also provided technical assistance and research support to a variety of government, think tank, and nonprofit organizations engaged in the development, provision, and/or evaluation of programs and services targeted to low-income, homeless, and minority populations. In addition, she engaged in international collaborations revolving around planning for sustainability. Zonta previously worked at the UCLA Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, RAND Corporation, and the University of Southern California.

Her publications include:

“Applying for Mortgage Loans in Immigrant Communities: The Case of Asian Enclaves in Los Angeles,” Environment & Planning A 44 (1) (2012): 89–110.

“The Continuing Significance of Ethnic Resources: Korean-Owned Banks in Los Angeles, New York, and Washington D.C.,” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 38 (3) (2012): 463–484.

“From the Homeownership Trap to Alternative Forms of Tenure and Financing,” Progressive Planning 182 (2010): 2–5.

Zonta holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Milan, as well as a master’s degree and a doctorate in urban planning, both from the University of California, Los Angeles.

By Michela Zonta
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House Budget Would Raise Borrowing Costs for the Middle ClassCenter for American ProgressJuly 31, 2017
8 Ways the Trump Budget Threatens the Health and Safety of American FamiliesCenter for American ProgressMay 23, 2017
The Trump Budget’s Attack on People with DisabilitiesCenter for American ProgressMay 23, 2017
The Trump Budget Neglects Basic Protections and Funds a Deportation Force InsteadCenter for American ProgressMay 23, 2017
The Importance of Dodd-Frank, in 6 ChartsCenter for American ProgressMarch 27, 2017
Toward Jobs and JusticeCenter for American ProgressJanuary 9, 2017
The Role of Midwestern Housing Instability in the 2016 ElectionCenter for American ProgressNovember 29, 2016
Housing the Extended FamilyCenter for American ProgressOctober 19, 2016
Protecting Communities on the Road to RecoveryCenter for American ProgressJune 28, 2016
Community Land TrustsCenter for American ProgressJune 20, 2016
The Uneven Housing RecoveryCenter for American ProgressNovember 2, 2015
Interactive Map: The Uneven Housing RecoveryCenter for American ProgressNovember 2, 2015
Time to Reboot the Housing MarketCenter for American ProgressSeptember 30, 2015
Lease Purchase Failed Before—Can It Work Now?Center for American ProgressApril 29, 2015
Language Access Is a Consumer Protection IssueCenter for American ProgressApril 17, 2015
The Unequal Mortgage Market Is No CoincidenceCenter for American ProgressOctober 20, 2014