Racial Equity and Community-Informed Policies

The K-12 Education team intentionally applies an explicit race and resource equity lens to our policy and research agenda. This means looking at potential impacts on communities who do not identify as white or who have large concentrations of families with low incomes, without conflating the two. We aim to set a standard where equity is not just a trendy concept, but rather one centered in all education policymaking and practice, and where institutional racism is called out and addressed as a barrier to progress. See the K-12 Education team’s other core priority areas:

  1. College, Career, and Civic Readiness
  2. Modernizing and Elevating the Teaching Profession
  3. Investment and Funding Equity in Public Education

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Closing Advanced Coursework Equity Gaps for All Students
Report Tenth-grade students make programming adjustments to a robot that they are testing in a Computer Science Principles course at a Maryland high school, December 2017. (Getty/Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)

Closing Advanced Coursework Equity Gaps for All Students

Even in high schools with similar levels of access to advanced coursework, Black, Latinx, and Indigenous students are less likely to be enrolled in advanced courses—and even when they are enrolled, they experience less success in these courses than their peers.

Roby Chatterji, Neil Campbell, Abby Quirk

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Fighting Systemic Racism in K-12 Education: Helping Allies Move From the Keyboard to the School Board Article
Student activists from New York City public schools—which remain some of the most segregated in the nation—meet with Board of Education officials demanding an end to all metal detectors, a more equitable division of resources within the school system, and reforms to the admissions process, January 2020. (Getty/Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis)

Fighting Systemic Racism in K-12 Education: Helping Allies Move From the Keyboard to the School Board

The surge of new allies in the Black Lives Matter movement for racial justice presents a welcome opportunity to implement systemic changes in the U.S. K-12 education system—and allies should start by following the lead of communities that are Black, Indigenous, and people of color.

Roby Chatterji

How K-12 Schools Should Prepare for Coronavirus Article
A student leaves elementary school with a parent after the Seattle Public School system was closed abruptly due to coronavirus fears on March 11, 2020. (Getty/John Moore)

How K-12 Schools Should Prepare for Coronavirus

The coronavirus outbreak is forcing school leaders to make difficult decisions; equity should be the priority in plans to support students and continue educational activities if schools need to close.

Neil Campbell

One Size Does Not Fit All Report
 (A one-year-old girl is shown standing and eating a cookie, surrounded by Latinx parents attending a school board meeting.)

One Size Does Not Fit All

A new Center for American Progress survey and analysis illustrate the importance of schools communicating different types of information to parents through a variety of communication systems in order to strengthen school-home partnerships and engagement.

Meg Benner, Abby Quirk

Strengthening Democracy With a Modern Civics Education Report
 (High school students sit through class under a U.S. flag in Sidney, Ohio, October 2019.)

Strengthening Democracy With a Modern Civics Education

Local, state, and national policymakers need to support and cultivate a robust high school civics education.

Ashley Jeffrey, Scott Sargrad

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