Juneteenth

Juneteenth commemorates the end of slavery. It’s been 155 years since June 19, 1865, but Black people still aren’t free. Black people are still demanding equal rights, equal treatment, and full access to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Whether it's coronavirus, the racial wealth gap, or the killing of Black people at the hands of law enforcement, the call to action on this Juneteenth must be focused on structural reform. This pandemic has not only highlighted structural problems in our health care and economic systems, it has exacerbated racial and ethnic disparities that have long been pushed aside. The recent killings of Black people has done the same—further showcasing the need to focus on the criminal justice system as a whole instead of focusing on bad apples. To effectively remove systematic racism, we must be unafraid to change our country’s economic, social, and civic intuitions.The following products highlight some of our work focused on these issues and on structural reform.

Latest

Let Black Soldiers Know The Military ‘Gets It’: Rename Bases Named After Confederate Generals In the News

Let Black Soldiers Know The Military ‘Gets It’: Rename Bases Named After Confederate Generals

As protesters and lawmakers act to remove Confederate monuments and statues from public spaces across the country, Frank Kendall argues that it is also time for the military to rename U.S. bases named for Confederate generals as a necessary first step toward addressing systemic racism.

Frank Kendall

On the Persistence of the Black-White Unemployment Gap Report
A man fills out an application at a job fair in Chicago on June 12, 2014. (Getty/Scott Olson)

On the Persistence of the Black-White Unemployment Gap

The United States needs policies that challenge structural racism in order to close the persistent unemployment gap between African Americans and whites.

Olugbenga Ajilore

Systemic Inequality: Displacement, Exclusion, and Segregation Report
Typical row home facades on a residential street off Germantown Avenue in Philadelphia on November 9, 2017. (Typical row home facades on a residential street off Germantown Avenue in Philadelphia on November 9, 2017.)

Systemic Inequality: Displacement, Exclusion, and Segregation

The United States must reckon with the racism built into its housing system in order to ensure that all Americans have the opportunity to build wealth.

Danyelle Solomon, Connor Maxwell, Abril Castro

Truth and Reconciliation Report
Civil rights advocates carry placards during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in Washington, D.C. (Getty/Universal History Archive/Warren K. Leffler)

Truth and Reconciliation

In order to address centuries of collective harm to African Americans, the United States must acknowledge the impacts of slavery and make an intentional choice to rebuild itself in an equitable manner.

Danyelle Solomon

Progressive Governance Can Turn the Tide for Black Farmers Report
A crop farmer and recipient of USDA farm subsidies works to prepare equipment for evening planting of corn in Hull, Sioux County, Iowa, April 2011. (Getty/Melina Mara)

Progressive Governance Can Turn the Tide for Black Farmers

Inclusive progressive solutions are key to addressing the structural racism of previous U.S. farm policies—something that nearly wiped out black farmers.

Abril Castro, Caius Z. Willingham

The Madness Doesn’t End in March Report
DURHAM, NC - FEBRUARY 20: Cam Reddish #2, Marques Bolden #20, Tre Jones #3, Zion Williamson #1 and RJ Barrett #5 of the Duke Blue Devils huddle against the North Carolina Tar Heels in the first half at Cameron Indoor Stadium on February 20, 2019 in Durham, North Carolina. (Photo by Lance King/Getty Images)

The Madness Doesn’t End in March

Big-time college sports distort the reality of black male students’ experience on college campuses, so much so that black male athletes represent a sizable chunk of black men in Power Five schools.

Sara Garcia, Connor Maxwell

Show More