Departments

Inclusive Growth

We work to address the deep inequities in our economy to ensure that all Americans can live secure and stable lives.

Workers install visors into a new SUV on an assembly line in Kentucky. (Getty/Bill Pugliano)

What We're Doing

Building an economy for all

We need a new social compact with business that reenvisions their obligations to society on issues such as environmental and climate matters, economic opportunity for workers, paying their fair share in taxes, and racial equality in the pursuit of more equitable, sustainable growth.

Ending disparities in public health

We work to strengthen the public health system by addressing health disparities that are not only caused by inequities in access to medical care but also by inequities in other social determinants of health, including income, education, and a person’s lived environment.

Lifting families out of poverty

We seek to ensure that every American who works a full-time job can live a life of dignity and that all Americans can rely on strong and stable support programs when they need them. This includes expanding and streamlining vital programs, increasing wages, and creating economic mobility for all. 

 

Protecting and advancing rights for all women

Embracing the diverse experiences and meeting the challenges faced by women across race, ethnicity, disability, sexuality, and other factors is central to inclusive growth. We work to secure women’s health, autonomy, economic stability, and access to equitable opportunities.  

 

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Featured

The Biden Boom: Economic Recovery in 2021
Article President Joe Biden gives remarks in Statuary Hall of the U.S Capitol.

The Biden Boom: Economic Recovery in 2021

President Joe Biden took office one year ago amid one of the worst economies in generations, but the U.S. economy has since made tremendous progress toward recovery, and workers are benefiting.

Seth Hanlon, Lily Roberts, Andres Vinelli, 2 More Rose Khattar, Nick Buffie

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4 Ways Unions Make Our Economy and Democracy Stronger Article
Members of the Boston Teachers Union and their supporters rally in support of contract measures.

4 Ways Unions Make Our Economy and Democracy Stronger

Unions raise wages for workers, reduce inequality, increase voter turnout, and advance middle-class interests; policymakers should make strengthening unions a top priority.

Sachin Shiva

Any Budget Deal Should Preserve Parity Article
The U.S. Capitol

Any Budget Deal Should Preserve Parity

As Congress renegotiates the budget levels for fiscal year 2025, it should match every additional dollar of defense investment with an equal amount of nondefense spending.

Bobby Kogan, Jessica Vela

Supreme Court Dismisses Idaho v. United States Without Making a Decision on Emergency Abortion Care
The U.S. Supreme Court is pictured on June 26, 2024, a day before issuing its ruling in Idaho v. United States.

Supreme Court Dismisses Idaho v. United States Without Making a Decision on Emergency Abortion Care

While the merits of Idaho v. United States will be decided by the lower courts, the U.S. Supreme Court admitted to procedural miscalculations that directly compromised the safety of pregnant patients in Idaho—underscoring how pregnant patients and medical providers will continue to be caught in the chaos and confusion sowed by the politicization of medication.

Sabrina Talukder

CAP Responds to Request for Information on Consolidation in Health Care Markets Article

CAP Responds to Request for Information on Consolidation in Health Care Markets

The Center for American Progress submitted a response to the U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Trade Commission, and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ request for information on consolidation in health care markets.

In U.S. v. Rahimi, Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Domestic Violence Survivor Safety but Upholds Problematic Bruen Framework Article
Photo shows a Supreme Court building partly lit inside, against a dark blue sky

In U.S. v. Rahimi, Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Domestic Violence Survivor Safety but Upholds Problematic Bruen Framework

On June 21, 2024, the U.S. Supreme Court determined that a sensible and effective gun violence prevention law protecting domestic violence survivors remains constitutional; however, the fact that survivor safety was compromised because of the politicization of the judiciary—and could be again in the future—should not be forgotten.

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