Tribal and Indigenous Issues

The Center for American Progress collaborates with Indigenous communities through an intersectional approach that emphasizes partnership, consultation, and respect for Tribal sovereignty. We support Tribal and Indigenous-led conservation initiatives that promote sustainable practices, protect natural resources, and improve Indigenous stewardship of lands and waters.

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Guide to Rural and Tribal Capacity-Building Programs Report
Joe Biden in front of clouds in sky

Guide to Rural and Tribal Capacity-Building Programs

These 10 federal programs are designed to expand capacity and bridge the gap between federal resources and the rural and Tribal communities that need them most.

Mark Haggerty, Chéri Smith

A Day in the Life of a Conservation Advocate Video

A Day in the Life of a Conservation Advocate

Follow Tina Sablan, former representative of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, as she goes to Washington, D.C., to advocate for a management plan for the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument—and for the inclusion of the Indigenous people of the Mariana Islands in the conservation of their lands and water.

‘Under the Pala Pala’: Special Edition Episode Video

‘Under the Pala Pala’: Special Edition Episode

In this special edition episode, six national marine sanctuary advocates came together for a storytelling event hosted by the Center for American Progress and the National Ocean Protection Coalition at the fifth International Marine Protected Area Congress in Vancouver, Canada, to talk Indigenous-led conservation.

CAP Event Highlights Partners in Indigenous-Led Conservation Article

CAP Event Highlights Partners in Indigenous-Led Conservation

Native Americans in Philanthropy and the Center for American Progress are working together to support a 30x30 conservation agenda driven by Indigenous traditional ecological leadership and storied knowledge of U.S. lands and waterways.

Angelo Villagomez, Joel Moffett

Protecting Avi Kwa Ame as a National Monument Would Honor Tribes and Increase Access to Nature Article
Photo shows Avi Kwa Ame at night, against a background of a starry sky.

Protecting Avi Kwa Ame as a National Monument Would Honor Tribes and Increase Access to Nature

President Biden must use the Antiquities Act to designate Avi Kwa Ame as a national monument. He faces a critical opportunity to honor ancient sacred lands; conserve ecologically important sites; advance the administration’s 30x30 goal; and enact community-led conservation to close the nature gap.

Sam Zeno

Proposed National Marine Sanctuaries Provide a Pathway Toward Indigenous-Led Ocean Conservation Report
Three large turtles rest above the waterline on a white-sand beach.

Proposed National Marine Sanctuaries Provide a Pathway Toward Indigenous-Led Ocean Conservation

The United States can move closer to its dual goals of increasing access to nature for all Americans and protecting 30 percent of lands and waters by 2030 by approving and completing the designation of five new Indigenous-led marine sanctuaries.

Anuka Upadhye, Zainab Mirza, Angelo Villagomez

‘Under the Pala Pala’: Episode 4 Video

‘Under the Pala Pala’: Episode 4

In episode 4 of “Under The Pala Pala,” Angelo Villagomez from the Center for American Progress talks about what it’s like for Natives to work for green nongovernmental organizations in Washington, D.C., with Michaela Pavlat from the National Parks Conservation Association and Javan Santos from The Climate Initiative.

U.S. Pacific Territories and the America the Beautiful Initiative Can Deliver Ocean Climate Solutions Article
A shallow coral head appears in front of Fatu Rock.

U.S. Pacific Territories and the America the Beautiful Initiative Can Deliver Ocean Climate Solutions

The U.S. Pacific territories are vast—combined, their ocean areas are nearly twice the size of Alaska—and they are home to some of the world's largest marine protected areas. This region will be critical for achieving the Biden administration’s goals to combat climate change, protect 30 percent of lands and waters by 2030, and ensure access to nature for all Americans.

Angelo Villagomez, Anuka Upadhye, Zainab Mirza

The COVID-19 Response in Indian Country Report

The COVID-19 Response in Indian Country

The disproportionate devastation COVID-19 is having in Native American communities lays bare the U.S. government’s systemic failure to meet its trust and treaty obligations.

Sahir Doshi, Allison Jordan, Kate Kelly, 1 More Danyelle Solomon

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