Katrina: 10 Years Later

In this series

Hurricane Katrina: Ten Years Later
In the News

Hurricane Katrina: Ten Years Later

On TalkPoverty Radio, hosts Rebecca Vallas and Tracey Ross shine a light on the effects of extreme weather, racial inequality, and poverty.

Tracey Ross, Rebecca Vallas, Danielle Baussan

The Legacy of Katrina
Video

The Legacy of Katrina

It has been 10 years since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and disproportionately affected its poor and black residents. Senior Fellow Sam Fulwood asks what have we learned since those dark days in Louisiana a decade ago.

Sam Fulwood III, Kulsum Ebrahim, Andrew Satter

Hurricane Katrina’s Health Care Legacy
Dr. Alan Shapiro, of the Children's Health Fund in New York, gives an asthma breathing test to Ja'Shayna Davis in Gulfport, Mississippi, on September 13, 2005. (AP/Darron Cummings)
Report

Hurricane Katrina’s Health Care Legacy

Gulf Coast states must expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act to address the long-term consequences of the federal government’s failed health policy response to Hurricane Katrina.

Thomas Huelskoetter

Lessons on Climate Change and Poverty From the California Drought
Gino Celli inspects wheat nearing harvest on his farm near Stockton, California, May 18, 2015. (AP/Rich Pedroncelli)
Report

Lessons on Climate Change and Poverty From the California Drought

Communities of color and low-income people living in tribal, rural, and agricultural communities throughout California are enduring high rates of unemployment, limited and costly access to safe and affordable water, and food insecurity as a consequence of the California drought.

Wendy Ortiz

When You Can’t Go Home
Rhonda Braden walks through the destruction brought by Hurricane Katrina in her childhood neighborhood on August 31, 2005, in Long Beach, Mississippi. (AP/Rob Carr)
Report

When You Can’t Go Home

In Hurricane Katrina’s 10-year wake, there is still much to learn about the effects and frequency of climate displacement.

Danielle Baussan

Remembering Katrina in the #BlackLivesMatter Movement
In the News

Remembering Katrina in the #BlackLivesMatter Movement

While an extreme weather event, such as a flood, heat wave, or hurricane, may seem like an equal opportunity force of destruction, in reality, these events exacerbate the underlying injustices that exist in our communities year round.

Tracey Ross

State Future Funds
People wait to board a train to New York City at the Trenton train station in Trenton, New Jersey, July 2014. (AP/Mel Evans)
Report

State Future Funds

For state and local leaders wondering how to keep pace with demands for clean energy and public transit, State Future Funds just may be the answer.

Cathleen Kelly

Extreme Weather on the Rise
Cars sit on the edge of a sinkhole in the Charles Village neighborhood of Baltimore, April 30, 2014, as heavy rain moved through the region. (AP)
Article

Extreme Weather on the Rise

The most severe weather events of 2014 took 65 lives and cost more than $19 billion, showing that the need for increased resilience investment is greater than ever.

Miranda Peterson, Alexander Fields