Building an Economy for All

Economic growth must be built on the foundation of a strong and secure middle class so that all Americans, not just those at the top, benefit from growth.

A child holds hands with her father and mother, January 12, 2020. (Getty/The Washington Post/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)

What We're Doing

Investing in a stronger and more equitable economy

We must continue to invest in research, technology, and innovation in a manner that ensures participation and benefits communities that are too often left behind. Only through such an approach can the United States remain at the cutting edge in an increasingly competitive global market.

Strengthening worker power and economic mobility

We need to increase wages, reduce poverty among working families, increase worker power, and create pathways to economic mobility for all.

Raising the floor for basic living standards

Working toward a stronger and more equitable economy for everyone involves rebuilding, expanding, and strengthening America’s social safety net to make it more comprehensive in eligibility and services as well as more flexible in how it can be accessed and used.

Creating a new social compact with business

A new social compact with business includes a regulatory vision that better aligns investors, companies, and the public interest on critical matters such as climate, workers’ rights, and equality.

By the numbers

60M

The families of more than 60 million children have received CTC monthly payments since July 2021.

CAP, “Making the CTC and EITC Expansions Permanent Would Reduce Poverty and Grow the Economy” (2021).

$100

In 32 states, a typical family would save more than $100 per week on child care under the Build Back Better Act.

CAP, “The Build Back Better Act Would Greatly Lower Families’ Child Care Costs” (2021).

$22.5B

In a year, workers and their families lose $22.5 billion in wages due to lack of access to paid family and medical leave.

CAP, “A Real Recovery for Women Cannot Happen Without the Build Back Better Agenda” (2021).

$3.6T

The Build Back Better Act would raise $3.6 trillion in revenue to support investments in an inclusive, high-growth economy.

CAP, “Addressing Tax System Failings That Favor Billionaires and Corporations” (2021).

What You Can Do

Recent work

Latest

How the Government Can End Poverty for Native American Women Report
 (A mother and her 10-year-old son live without electricity or running water on a Navajo Nation reservation in Cameron, Arizona, during the coronavirus pandemic, March 2020.)

How the Government Can End Poverty for Native American Women

American Indian and Alaska Native women in the United States make just 60 cents for every dollar earned by their white male counterparts, and this wage gap forces too many of them and their families into poverty.

Arohi Pathak

The SEC’s Regulatory Role in the Digital Asset Markets Report
A technician inspects the backside of bitcoin mining at Bitfarms in Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec, on March 19, 2018. (Getty/AFP/Lars Hagberg)

The SEC’s Regulatory Role in the Digital Asset Markets

As the markets for digital assets such as cryptocurrencies grow, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and other financial regulators must impose sensible regulations on digital assets to protect traders and investors.

Todd Phillips

How To Make Corporate Boards More Diverse Report
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 01: Businessmen and shoppers walk along Madison Avenue, one of Manhattan's premier shopping and residential streets on November 1, 2011 in New York City. According to a new Census Bureau report, income inequality is greater in New York State and in the New York City region than in any other state or metropolitan area in the country. The report found that in three Manhattan neighborhoods, the Upper East and West Sides and Greenwich Village, the top 5 percent of households make an average of over $1 million. Inequality in America has become a campaign issue following the rise of the Occupy Wall Street movement and the continued high nationwide unemployment rate.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

How To Make Corporate Boards More Diverse

Race and gender diversity on corporate boards is unacceptably low, but better corporate practices and SEC engagement could help accelerate progress toward more diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Alexandra Thornton, Anjunae Chandran

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