Article

Building the G20 the Right Way

The what of the G20 summit is critical, but so is the how. Along with eight prime ministers, eleven other presidents, one chancellor, one king and a smattering of international organisation leaders, President Barack Obama will travel to London this week. There, we must all hope, this group will overcome its differences and agree to coordinated stimulus measures that break the fall of the global economy; beat back the wave of beggar-thy-neighbour trade policies; ensure that low carbon strategies animate the global economic recovery; find a way to assist the developing world; revamp the roles of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank; and hammer out principles - or, even better, a new architecture – for banking and financial regulation so this kind of financial disaster cannot happen again.

The what of the G20 summit is critical, but so is the how. Along with eight prime ministers, eleven other presidents, one chancellor, one king and a smattering of international organisation leaders, President Barack Obama will travel to London this week. There, we must all hope, this group will overcome its differences and agree to coordinated stimulus measures that break the fall of the global economy; beat back the wave of beggar-thy-neighbour trade policies; ensure that low carbon strategies animate the global economic recovery; find a way to assist the developing world; revamp the roles of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank; and hammer out principles – or, even better, a new architecture – for banking and financial regulation so this kind of financial disaster cannot happen again.

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Authors

Nina Hachigian

Senior Fellow

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