Social Determinants of Health

Social determinants of health are the nonclinical factors that affect health outcomes. They include systemic racism, along with the broad categories of social and community context, education, neighborhood and environment, health care, and economic stability. The Center for American Progress’ work prioritizes social and economic policies that are critical across the social determinants of health to achieve health equity. The following publications aim to reduce health disparities and inequities and improve the nation’s health by addressing social determinants of health.

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A Strong Start in Life: How Public Health Policies Affect the Well-Being of Pregnancies and Families Report
A mother kisses her child as her midwife examines her at a birthing center in South Los Angeles.

A Strong Start in Life: How Public Health Policies Affect the Well-Being of Pregnancies and Families

Understanding how the key social determinants of health—including housing, employment, and education—affect perinatal health is critical to ensuring that federal policies support healthy babies and families.

Maximizing Federal Investments To Address Social Determinants of Health Report
A resident-in-training physician gets a high-five from a 5-year-old patient as the patient’s mother sits by at a health center in Washington, D.C.

Maximizing Federal Investments To Address Social Determinants of Health

In its response to a request for information from the Congressional Caucus for Social Determinants of Health, CAP outlined challenges in addressing the social and economic conditions that affect health and actions Congress can take to improve them.

Marquisha Johns

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