Energy and Environment

Conservation Policy

We work to protect our lands, waters, ocean, and wildlife to address the linked climate and biodiversity crises, boost the economy, and benefit all.

Bald eagles fishing in China Poot Bay, Alaska. (Getty/Louise Heusinkveld/Photodisc)

What We're Doing

Conserve 30 percent of lands, waters, and ocean by 2030

“30×30” is a science-backed goal to address the linked climate and biodiversity crises by conserving 30 percent of U.S. lands, waters, and oceans by 2030. We work with a diverse coalition to achieve on-the-ground protections that benefit nature, the climate, and communities.

Move toward pollution-free public lands and waters

Despite the climate crisis, the oil and gas lobby continues to push for more drilling on public lands and waters. We advocate for energy policy reform and a just transition so that the land, water, and ocean shared by all communities can be used for the common good.

Confront racial and economic disparities in access to nature

People of color and low-income communities disproportionately lack access to nature and bear the impacts of its destruction. We work with front-line communities to advocate for policies that right historical wrongs and affirm Indigenous leadership and tribal sovereignty.

Advocate for nature-based solutions to the climate crisis

We cannot stabilize the climate without increasing protections for nature. One of the most effective strategies for mitigating climate change is to protect and restore more land and water. We work toward policies that connect climate action and nature-based solutions.

The Conservation Policy team works to protect our lands, waters, ocean, and wildlife to address the linked climate and biodiversity crises, boost the economy, and benefit all.

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Recent Work

Latest

US Pacific Territories and the America the Beautiful Initiative Can Deliver Ocean Climate Solutions Article
A shallow coral head appears in front of Fatu Rock.

US Pacific Territories and the America the Beautiful Initiative Can Deliver Ocean Climate Solutions

The U.S. Pacific territories are vast—combined, their ocean areas are nearly twice the size of Alaska—and they are home to some of the world's largest marine protected areas. This region will be critical for achieving the Biden administration’s goals to combat climate change, protect 30 percent of lands and waters by 2030, and ensure access to nature for all Americans.

Executive Action vs. the Nature Crisis: Top 8 Opportunities President Biden Should Pursue To Meet His America the Beautiful Commitment Report
U.S. President Joe Biden gives a speech before designating Camp Hale as a national monument.

Executive Action vs. the Nature Crisis: Top 8 Opportunities President Biden Should Pursue To Meet His America the Beautiful Commitment

President Joe Biden committed to putting the United States on a path to conserve 30 percent of its lands and waters by 2030; here are eight major opportunities he must pursue immediately to achieve this goal.

Project Decisions in Alaska Will Help Define Biden’s Conservation and Climate Legacy Article
Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is pictured.

Project Decisions in Alaska Will Help Define Biden’s Conservation and Climate Legacy

From a potential Arctic oil drilling hub to a mine that threatens one of the world’s most productive salmon fisheries, a series of upcoming project decisions in Alaska are poised to shape the Biden administration’s conservation and climate legacy.

More work needed on MPAs In the News

More work needed on MPAs

Steven Johnson and Angelo Villagomez discuss their recent study which assesses the quantity and quality of marine protected areas in the Mariana Islands.

Steven Mana‘oakamai Johnson, Angelo Villagomez

How FEMA Can Build Rural Resilience Through Disaster Preparedness Report
Photo shows a flooded street in Kentucky.

How FEMA Can Build Rural Resilience Through Disaster Preparedness

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is vital to the nation’s climate resilience, but pre-disaster resilience funds are not reaching the rural communities most vulnerable to climate risk and least able to prepare.

Kevin Manuele, Mark Haggerty

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