Improving Access to Birth Control at the State Level

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade has illuminated the critical need for state policymakers to urgently assess and implement policies to advance reproductive health care, including contraceptive care and services. This series examines four promising policy options that policymakers can pursue to improve and expand contraceptive access at the state level:

  • Implementing one-year and extended supply dispensing policies
  • Improving and expanding pharmacist prescribing authority and practices
  • Expanding family planning benefits through Medicaid 1115 waivers and state plan amendments
  • Establishing contraceptive quality measures
  • A woman reads a reminder and expiration card for a contraceptive implant.
    A woman reads a reminder and expiration card for a contraceptive implant she received from Boulder Valley Women's Health Center on December 19, 2007. (Getty/Digital First Media/Boulder Daily Camera/Josh Lawton)

    In this series

    Fact Sheet: Common Challenges and Recommended Solutions for Implementing Pharmacist Prescribing of Contraceptives
    Person holding birth control pills
    Fact Sheet

    Fact Sheet: Common Challenges and Recommended Solutions for Implementing Pharmacist Prescribing of Contraceptives

    This fact sheet accompanies a new Center for American Progress report on best practices to expand and improve contraceptive access at the state level, covering common implementation challenges and offering recommendations for expanding pharmacists’ prescriptive authority.

    Kierra B. Jones

    Fact Sheet: Common Challenges to Implementing One-Year Supply Policies and Recommended Solutions
    Planned Parenthood birth control sign.
    Fact Sheet

    Fact Sheet: Common Challenges to Implementing One-Year Supply Policies and Recommended Solutions

    This fact sheet accompanies the Center for American Progress’ report on best practices to expand and improve contraceptive access at the state level, covering common implementation challenges and offering recommendations for one-year contraceptive dispensing policies.

    Kierra B. Jones

    This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.