Going ROWE

In this series

Still ROWE-ing in Minnesota County Human Services and Public Health Department
Best Buy, a Minnesota-based company, went ROWE in 2003, giving visibility to the concept. The Human Services and Public Health Department in Hennepin County, Minneapolis’ largest county, decided to go ROWE in April 2009. (AP/Reed Saxon)
Article

Still ROWE-ing in Minnesota County Human Services and Public Health Department

A D.C. government agency’s transformation into a “results-only work environment” is still on hold pending a mayoral transition, but ROWE is going strong in a Minneapolis county government department according to the ROWE manager there.

Gadi Dechter

ROWE Transition on “Pause”
Jody Thompson of CultureRx walks OCTO's senior leadership through a presentation of traditional workplace rules that will be irrelevant in a "results-only work environment. (Center for American Progress/Gadi Dechter)
Article

ROWE Transition on “Pause”

A D.C. government agency’s transformation into a “results-only work environment” suffers its first major setback when city officials halt the initiative until the incoming mayor’s transition team has a chance to review it.

Gadi Dechter

Mythical HR Rules and Real Employee Complaints
A leadership team in Washington, D.C.'s Office of the Chief Technology Officer discuss how to transform their 550-person department into a "results only work environment," where people will be able to work when they want, where they want—so long as they meet predefined goals. (Center for American Progress/Gadi Dechter)
Article

Mythical HR Rules and Real Employee Complaints

A D.C. government agency’s transformation into a “results-only work environment” kicks into high gear this week after managers get anonymous feedback from employee focus groups. The third installment in a new weekly series by Gadi Dechter.

Gadi Dechter

The Guinea Pigs in the Basement
Article

The Guinea Pigs in the Basement

The second installment in a new weekly series by Gadi Dechter on a D.C. government agency’s transformation into a “results-only work environment” finds the department’s “guinea pigs” in a public library basement, making metrics.

Gadi Dechter

Hopes and Fears
Bryan Sivak, Washington, D.C's chief technology officer, is looking to boost productivity in his department with a "results-only work environment" during punishing budget cuts and a citywide hiring freeze. (Flickr/<a href= David Clow)" data-srcset="https://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/rowe101310_onpage.jpg?w=610 610w, https://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/rowe101310_onpage.jpg?w=610 610w, https://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/rowe101310_onpage.jpg?w=610 610w, https://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/rowe101310_onpage.jpg?w=500 500w, https://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/rowe101310_onpage.jpg?w=250 250w" data-sizes="auto" />
Article

Hopes and Fears

The first installment in a new weekly series by Gadi Dechter on implementing a “results-only work environment” in a D.C. government agency looks at employees’ expectations and potential obstacles for the initiative.

Gadi Dechter