Stolen Guns in America

A State-by-State Analysis

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Stolen Guns in America
AP/Jeff Roberson

This November 15, 2014, photo shows handguns in a display case at Metro Shooting Supplies in Bridgeton, Missouri.

  • OVERVIEW

    The number of firearms being stolen in the United States is staggering—and while policymakers must take steps to mitigate this concern, gun dealers and private gun owners have a responsibility to ensure that guns are not vulnerable to theft.

  • PRESS CONTACT

Introduction and summary

In the early morning hours of July 5, 2017, New York Police Department officer Miosotis Familia was ambushed as she sat in a marked NYPD command truck with her partner while providing additional security to a Bronx neighborhood after Fourth of July festivities. In an attack that police officials described as an assassination, Officer Familia was fatally shot in the head with a gun that had been stolen in Charleston, West Virginia, four years earlier.1 Less than a month earlier on the other side of the country, a UPS driver in San Francisco shot and killed three co-workers and injured two others using a gun that had been stolen in Utah. The shooter was also armed with a gun that had been stolen in Napa County, California.2

Stolen guns pose a significant risk to community safety. Whether stolen from a gun store or an individual gun owner’s collection, these guns often head straight into the illegal underground gun market, where they are sold, traded, and used to facilitate violent crimes. Gun theft is not a minor problem in the United States. According to data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), during the four-year period from 2012 to 2015, nearly half a billion dollars worth of guns were stolen from individuals nationwide, amounting to an estimated 1.2 million guns.3 Twenty-two thousand guns were stolen from gun stores during this same period.4 A gun is stolen in the U.S. every two minutes.5

This problem does not affect all states equally. The rate and volume of guns stolen from both gun stores and private collections vary widely from state to state. From 2012 through 2015, the average rate of the five states with the highest rates of gun theft from private owners—Tennessee, Arkansas, South Carolina, Oklahoma, and Alabama—was 13 times higher than the average rate of the five states with the lowest rates—Hawaii, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and Massachusetts.6 Similarly, from 2012 through 2016, the average rate of the five states with the highest rates of guns stolen from gun stores was 18 times higher than the average rate the five states with the lowest rates.7

States that are in the top 10 for highest number of guns stolen from both gun stores and private owners

Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina and Texas

Gun owners and dealers have a substantial responsibility to take reasonable measures to protect against theft and help ensure that their guns do not become part of this illegal inventory. This report analyzes data from the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) to provide state-by-state data on the frequency with which guns are stolen from licensed gun dealers and individual gun owners in communities across the country. It then offers a number of policy solutions to help prevent future gun thefts.

Stolen guns pose substantial risks to public safety

Guns stolen from gun stores and the private collections of individual gun owners pose a substantial risk to public safety. Stolen guns often end up being used in the commission of violent crime. During the six-year period between January 2010 and December 2015, 9,736 guns that were recovered by police in connection with a crime and traced by ATF had been reported stolen or lost from gun stores.8 A recent investigation by the Commercial Appeal of stolen guns in Memphis, Tennessee, found that of the roughly 9,100 guns reported stolen in the city between January 2011 and June 2016, 21 were later connected to homicides, 27 to robberies, 62 to aggravated assaults, and 64 to drug crimes.9

Theft is also one of the key ways that guns are diverted from the lawful market and into illegal gun trafficking networks. ATF describes burglaries of gun stores as “a significant source of illegally trafficked firearms” and has noted that “investigative experience shows that each of those stolen firearms is almost assuredly destined for criminal use in the immediate area of the theft.”10 A 2000 ATF report that reviewed all firearms trafficking investigations undertaken by the agency between July 1996 and December 1998—the most recent such study the agency has conducted—found that nearly 14 percent of those cases involved guns stolen from licensed gun dealers and another 10 percent involved guns stolen from private residences.11 These investigations involved more than 9,300 illegally trafficked guns.12 Another study analyzed data on 893 guns recovered by the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police Firearms Trafficking Unit in 2008 and found that for close to 32 percent of these firearms, their original owners claimed they had been stolen.13

Stolen guns become untraceable and thwart the ability of law enforcement officers to solve violent crimes. When a gun is recovered in connection with a crime, local police departments can submit identifying information about the gun to ATF for tracing—a process that allows ATF to identify the licensed gun dealer that originally counted the gun as part of its inventory. When a gun is lawfully purchased from a gun dealer, the dealer retains paperwork that identifies this first retail purchaser. The dealer can then provide this information to law enforcement upon request as part of a crime gun trace. This can be a crucial investigatory lead for local investigators working to solve a violent crime. When a gun is stolen from a gun dealer’s inventory, however, this investigative lead immediately goes cold, making it more difficult to identify potential suspects. Guns that are stolen from individual gun owners are similarly untraceable. While ATF can identify the first retail purchaser of a gun, the investigative trail ends when that person reports that the gun has been stolen.

Gun dealers as a prime target

Gun stores are obvious targets for criminals looking to steal guns. Indeed, ATF has reported a substantial increase in robberies and burglaries of gun stores over the past five years. Between 2012 and 2016, burglaries of licensed gun dealers increased 48 percent, and robberies of licensed gun dealers increased 175 percent.14 During this period, nearly 31,500 guns were stolen from gun stores nationwide.15 However, these thefts are not evenly distributed across the country. Thefts from gun stores are more prevalent in the South, with seven of the 10 states with the highest number of firearms stolen from gun dealers located in the southern region of the United States. Some states also experienced a sharp increase in the number of guns stolen from dealers in 2016. These thefts increased 122 percent in Georgia from 2015 to 2016, from 515 guns to 1,144 guns. California and South Carolina saw a 174 percent increase and a 383 percent increase, respectively, during the same period.16 A nonexhaustive list of examples of gun store thefts from nearly every state are included in the Appendix of this report.

Gun owners at risk

Individual gun owners are also targets for thieves. It is difficult to ascertain the exact number of guns that are stolen from individuals in the United States because many of these thefts are not reported to law enforcement. However, estimates from a number of survey studies indicate that roughly 200,000 to 400,000 guns are stolen from individuals each year.17 The most recent study by researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Northeastern University Department of Health Sciences found that approximately 380,000 firearms are stolen from gun owners each year, two-thirds of which are stolen in the southern region of the United States.18 This study identified a few common traits of gun owners who are victimized by theft: Those who own many guns, those who regularly carry their guns outside their homes, and those who do not employ safe storage practices while at home face a higher risk of gun theft.19

The most comprehensive repository of data on the number of guns stolen from individuals—as opposed to gun stores—comes from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report. Most individual police agencies in almost every state submit data annually to the FBI on the dollar value of many types of personal property reported stolen in their jurisdiction, including firearms. The FBI then aggregates these data to report on the total value of guns reported stolen in the United States each year. For many states, these numbers are likely an undercount because gun owners are not required by law to report gun thefts; moreover, police agencies from state to state have inconsistent reporting practices. In 2015, the FBI reported that $164 million worth of guns were reported stolen nationwide.20 As with theft from gun stores, however, the problem of guns stolen from private collections does not affect every state equally. For this report, the Center for American Progress went back to the stolen gun data submitted by local police agencies, then aggregated those data per state to arrive at state totals of the value of guns reported stolen in the most recent four years for which these data were available: 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015.21 CAP then subtracted the value of firearms later recovered by police to obtain an adjusted value of stolen firearms. Because the data reported by jurisdictions provide only the dollar amount of the value of the guns reported stolen, CAP used an average price of $450 per gun to calculate a rough estimate of the number of guns stolen in each state during this period, which is consistent with the average price per gun used by the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics in a 2012 report.22

The numbers are staggering and vary widely from state to state. In Texas alone during this four-year period, more than $79 million worth of guns were stolen, amounting to roughly 177,000 guns. Certainly, Texas’ large population contributes to this number; however, a comparison between two other states with a similar population size highlights the disparity among states. Georgia and Michigan have a roughly similar population size, yet more than three times as many guns were stolen in Georgia from 2012 to 2016 than in Michigan.23 Similarly, gun thefts were 24 times higher in Tennessee than in Massachusetts, two other states with similar population sizes.24 The vast majority of these guns are never found. On average, states recovered around 11 percent of stolen firearms from 2012 to 2016.25 These percentages also vary across states. While Maine recovered 28 percent of stolen guns during this period, Ohio and Tennessee only recovered 5 percent.26

Enforcement and policy approaches to reducing gun theft

Law enforcement officials across the country have become increasingly concerned about gun thefts from both gun stores and individual gun owners. These organizations have proposed several policies and actions that can be implemented to mitigate the number of stolen firearms.

Reducing thefts from gun stores

ATF has grown increasingly concerned about burglaries and robberies of licensed gun dealers. In its fiscal year 2018 budget request, ATF identified the increasing number of burglaries and robberies from gun dealers as one of the primary “external challenges” that are straining the agency’s limited resources.27 In addition to investigating each of these incidents, in January 2017 ATF launched a new system called fflAlert to notify gun stores of thefts in the area.28 ATF has also issued guidance to licensed gun dealers on steps they can take to “diminish risk” of theft or loss of guns in their inventory, such as evaluating potential security weaknesses with entrances, windows, and locks; installing an alarm system and video cameras; conducting a regular inventory reconciliation; and storing guns in a secure manner when the store is closed.29 Gun industry experts, such as the National Shooting Sports Foundation, a trade association for the gun industry, offer similar guidance to gun dealers.30

Under current law, however, ATF can do little more than offer voluntary suggestions to improve security at gun stores. Although ATF is the federal agency charged with licensing and regulating the gun industry, including licensed gun dealers, it does not have the authority to mandate that dealers implement any specific security measures designed to prevent theft. Andy Graham, ATF deputy assistant director for field operations, recently described this dynamic in an interview with The Trace: “We can suggest all day long, but ultimately, it comes down to the dealer taking responsibility for their facility and inventory.”31 John Ham, senior investigator and public information officer for the ATF Kansas City field division, similarly described the lack of authority to require certain measures as having a detrimental impact on the agency’s ability to prevent theft. In an interview with The Kansas City Star, he said, “We as an agency don’t have the regulatory authority to come in and say you have to have an alarm system, bars on the windows, cameras. … And while the vast majority of the industry has gone that direction themselves, it still hampers our ability to combat this as effectively as we’d like.”32

Nine states and Washington, D.C., have enacted laws to partially fill this gap and require gun dealers to implement some specific security measures, but such steps fall short of a comprehensive solution to the rising rate of firearm theft from gun stores.33 Congress should enact legislation that mandates certain security requirements for licensed gun dealers and gives ATF the authority to ensure compliance with these requirements. In July 2017, Rep. Brad Schneider (D-IL) introduced legislation that would require licensed gun dealers to store guns in a secure manner when their stores are closed and also would direct the U.S. attorney general to promulgate regulations requiring additional security measures.34 In addition to passing this legislation, Congress should remove the rider on ATF’s budget that prevents the agency from requiring gun dealers to conduct an annual inventory reconciliation, a commonsense business practice that would help ensure that dealers are keeping track of their dangerous inventory.35 Finally, Congress should provide ATF with the resources required to conduct regular compliance inspections of gun dealers to ensure that all dealers are complying with applicable laws and regulations and to help dealers identify potential security weaknesses before thefts occur.36

Reducing thefts from gun owners

Local law enforcement agencies across the country also are becoming increasingly concerned about gun thefts from individual gun owners, particularly thefts from vehicles. Police in Peoria, Illinois, saw a 27 percent increase in the number of guns reported stolen in just the first six months of 2017, with 76 guns reported stolen from homes or vehicles.37 Law enforcement in Memphis, Tennessee, found that gun thefts from vehicles had increased 38 percent from 2015 to 2016, with 851 guns stolen out of vehicles in 2016.38 In Gallatin County, Montana, gun thefts increased 50 percent from 2016 to 2017.39 An investigation in southwest Florida found that at least 625 guns were reported stolen in just three counties in 2016.40 An investigation by The Trace of data provided by police departments in 25 large U.S. cities found that parked cars have become a top target for gun thieves. In 2015, these 25 police departments reported roughly 4,800 guns stolen from vehicles, with many of these jurisdictions seeing a rise in these thefts over the previous year.41

Local police officials offer a few recommendations to gun owners for preventing gun theft, including not storing guns in vehicles or—if it is necessary to do so—storing them in a locked compartment in the vehicle.42 Only four states have enacted laws requiring gun owners to keep guns locked in certain circumstances, although 27 states have enacted laws designed to prevent children from accessing guns stored in the home, which generally impose civil or criminal liability for failure to do so.43 States should consider implementing laws or policies that require or incentivize gun owners to store guns securely to help protect against theft. Police also recommend that gun owners take note of the make and serial numbers of all guns in their possession so that they could help with an investigation should the guns be stolen.44 Additionally, law enforcement officials have expressed concern that expansive state gun laws that allow guns to be carried in more locations create additional opportunities for guns to be stolen.45

In addition, collecting comprehensive data on the number of guns stolen in the United States poses a substantial challenge, as there is no federal law requiring gun owners to report such thefts to law enforcement. Only nine states and Washington, D.C., have enacted state laws mandating that gun owners report when guns in their possession are stolen or lost.46 As a result, the data available to local law enforcement—which are then collected and aggregated by the FBI—are undoubtedly an undercount of the problem, as not all gun owners report these losses. An analysis of the National Crime Victimization Survey reveals that, from 2011 to 2015, 23 percent of crimes where guns were stolen from individuals—as opposed to gun dealers—were not reported to police.47 Similarly, a report from the Bureau of Justice Statistics estimated that household burglaries involving stolen firearms were reported to police in only 86 percent of the cases, suggesting that 14 percent were not reported.48

The lack of mandatory reporting of stolen guns also enables gun trafficking and straw purchasing by eliminating accountability and allowing individuals whose guns end up used in connection with crime to simply say that the guns were stolen. To help ensure a more accurate assessment of the prevalence of gun theft in the United States, Congress and state legislatures should enact laws requiring all gun owners to promptly report stolen or lost guns to law enforcement. This provision was included in a number of bills introduced in the last Congress, including the Fix Gun Checks Act of 2016, which was introduced by Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA).49 A June 2016 poll commissioned by The New York Times found that 88 percent of voters support this policy.50

Recommendations to reduce gun theft

  1. Enact federal legislation to require licensed gun dealers to implement certain minimum security measures, such as securely storing guns after business hours and installing alarm systems and cameras.
  2. Eliminate the rider on ATF’s budget that prevents the agency from requiring licensed gun dealers to conduct an annual inventory reconciliation.
  3. Provide ATF with additional resources to conduct more frequent gun dealer compliance inspections.
  4. Implement laws or policies that require or incentivize gun owners to store firearms securely.
  5. Enact federal and state legislation requiring gun owners to promptly report all stolen or lost guns to law enforcement.

With close to 300 million guns circulating in the United States, gun owners and dealers have a substantial obligation to ensure that they are not vulnerable to theft. While there are many factors that contribute to firearms being trafficked to secondary markets, thefts play an important role. Lawmakers should look at the high number of stolen guns and consider implementing these smart laws and actions to reduce theft.

Conclusion

The number of stolen guns in the United States is staggering. Whether taken from gun stores or from individual gun owners, a firearm is stolen every 2 minutes. These stolen guns are often diverted directly into illegal trafficking networks and end up being used in the commission of violent crimes.

Gun owners and gun dealers therefore have a compelling responsibility to take measures to help ensure that all guns in their possession are not vulnerable to theft. Implementing the policy recommendations in this report would be a smart and commonsense step forward in helping to reduce gun thefts and protect community safety.

Appendix

Below is a nonexhaustive list of incidents of gun store burglaries and robberies across the states. The authors looked at online news sources to identify recent cases.

ALABAMA

Guns & Ammo, Tuscaloosa, July 201651

Forty-five guns were stolen during a burglary of this gun store. 

Patriot Gun Sales, Montgomery, March 201652

Eighteen guns were stolen during a burglary of this gun store.

ALASKA

Mat-Su Tactical, LLC, Wasilla, March 201453

A lone perpetrator stole three pistols and a rifle from this gun store.

ARIZONA

Black Rock Arms, Mesa, December 201654  

A group of perpetrators stole 23 guns from this gun store.

ARKANSAS

Turtle Creek Pawn, Jonesboro, February 201755 

A truck was used to smash through the back entrance of this pawn store, allowing four perpetrators to steal 64 guns.

CALIFORNIA

Seven gun stores, Southern California, August–November 201556

A group of perpetrators burglarized seven different gun stores in Orange, Riverside, and Los Angeles counties during a four-month period, stealing a total of 128 guns.

Fresno Firearms, Fresno, December 201457

Armed perpetrators stole 13 handguns and critically injured an 85-year-old man during a robbery of this gun store.

COLORADO

Four gun stores, Denver and Colorado Springs, April–June 201758

A group of perpetrators broke into four gun stores during a three-month period and stole a total of more than 45 guns.

Colorado Gun Broker, Jefferson County, June 201659

Thirty-five guns were stolen during a burglary of this gun store.

RJC Firearms, Pueblo, September 201560

A group of four perpetrators broke into this gun store and stole 12 guns.

CONNECTICUT

Woodbridge Firearms Trading Post, Woodbridge, June 201561

Perpetrators used a stolen car to drive through the window of this gun store and steal an unspecified number of weapons.

DELAWARE

Southern Delaware Shooters Gun Shop, Laurel, February 201162

Three perpetrators stole 14 firearms from this gun store.

FLORIDA

Sunshine State Armory, Zephyrhills, April 201763

Robbers drove a truck through the window of this gun store and stole an unspecified number of firearms before driving away.

Guns Galore, Lakeland, January 201764

Nearly 50 guns were stolen during the second burglary of this gun store in just over a month.

Tampa Arms Company, Tampa, November 201665

A group of more than 10 suspects broke into this gun store around 3:00 a.m. and stole approximately 40 guns. They gained entry to the store by ramming a truck through the storefront.

Shooting Sports, Tampa, October 201566

Perpetrators used heavy machinery to break a hole in the concrete wall of this gun store, then stole 42 handguns in a burglary that took only 60 seconds.

GEORGIA

Backwoods Armory, Statesboro, June 201667

A thief stole 55 guns from this gun store.

Shots Fired, Covington, February 201668

Four thieves stole more than 40 guns during a burglary of this gun store.

HAWAII

Blue Water Hunter, Kona, January, 201569

Seventeen guns were stolen by an unknown number of perpetrators from this hunting supply store.

IDAHO

Bargain Barn, Plummer, July 201670

Two guns were stolen from this pawn shop.

ILLINOIS

Eagle Sports Range, Oak Forest, April 201771

Perpetrators used a cinder block to break the window of this gun store and range, then stole at least 40 firearms.

Buchheit of Centralia, Centralia, November 201472

A pair of perpetrators used a stolen truck to smash through the security gates in the parking lot of this general retailer, then broke the store’s windows and stole 39 guns and at least 1,000 rounds of ammunition.

INDIANA

Gunslingers, Anderson, May 201673

Two perpetrators stole three guns, ammunition, and accessories during a burglary of this gun store. 

KS & E Sports, Lawrence, November 201574

Armed robbers stole 43 guns from this gun store during a robbery that occurred during business hours.

IOWA

America’s Second Amendment Firearms, Cedar Rapids, June 201775

An unknown number of firearms was stolen from this gun store.

KANSAS

Signature Manufacturing, Merriam, April 201776

A thief stole thousands of dollars worth of firearms from this gun store.

KENTUCKY

111 Gun Shop, Louisville, July 201677

Perpetrators drove a vehicle into the front of this gun store, then stole an unknown number of guns.

LOUISIANA

Meaux Guns and Ammo, Baton Rouge, July 201578

Three perpetrators stole more than 50 guns from this gun store.

MAINE

Center Street Pawn Shop, Bangor, October 201679

A lone thief stole 16 handguns in a smash-and-grab robbery of this pawn shop.

MARYLAND

United Gun Shop, Rockville, March 201780

A pair of perpetrators stole 30 guns during a 90-second burglary of this gun store.

Blue Fins, Dundalk, August 201681

Five perpetrators stole 36 guns, cash, and other items from this bait and gun store during an armed robbery.

Fred’s Sports and Furniture, Waldorf, February 201482

Perpetrators broke into this gun store, stole more than 70 handguns, then set the store on fire, destroying it.

MASSACHUSETTS

Hitman Firearms, Tyngsborough, February 201683

Thieves stole four handguns from this gun shop.

MICHIGAN

Felix’s Marina and Guns, Robinson Township, October 201484

Approximately 30 handguns were stolen from this sporting goods and gun store during a burglary in which the perpetrator used a hammer to smash through a glass display case.

U.S. Lumber Company, Battle Creek, September 201485

Three armed perpetrators stole 26 guns from this building materials store during an after-hours burglary. 

MINNESOTA

Millville Rod and Gun Shop, Millville, September 201686

A group of three perpetrators broke into this gun store and stole approximately 75 guns.

MISSISSIPPI

Cook’s Gun Shop, D’Iberville, February 201487

A thief used a truck to ram through the front of this gun store and stole nine handguns.

MISSOURI

Eagle Armory, O’Fallon, June 201788

Thieves used a U-Haul truck to back into the front of this gun store and escaped with at least 20 guns.

MONTANA

All Season Motorsports, Sidney, August 201489

Thirteen guns were stolen during a burglary of this sporting goods store.

NEBRASKA

Archer Arms Pawn Shop and BigShots Indoor Range and Gun Store, Lincoln, February 201790

Two thieves stole 39 handguns in two separate robberies.

NEVADA

New Frontier Armory, North Las Vegas, August 201691

An unknown number of perpetrators stole 27 firearms from this gun store.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Wicked Weaponry Firearms, Hooksett, February 201692

A pair of thieves stole four firearms from this gun store.

NEW MEXICO

Bull Dog Firearms, Warriors Edge Armory, and Butch’s Guns, Albuquerque, December 201693

Four thieves used an SUV to ram into the storefronts of three gun stores in a three-hour span and stole an unspecified number of firearms.

NEW YORK

Intimidator Sports, Syracuse, November 201494

Two perpetrators smashed the front doors of this gun store with a sledgehammer, then stole nine handguns.

D&M Shooting Sports, Palmyra, January 201395

Twenty-five guns were stolen from this gun store during a burglary.

NORTH CAROLINA

Trigger Happy Guns, Clayton, June 201796

Five rifles were stolen from this store during a burglary. 

Tamz Guns & Ammo and Mackey’s Landing Firearms, Jamesville, April 201797

A group of perpetrators broke into these two gun stores on two separate occasions and stole multiple firearms from each store.

NORTH DAKOTA

NAPA/Myers Auto Parts, Williston, September 201498

Four thieves stole at least 44 guns from this store.

OHIO

Center Mass Defense, Hamilton, March 201799

A group of three perpetrators broke into this gun store by shooting out the glass in the front door and stole a total of six guns.

J&D Firearms, Warren, March 2016100

A pair of perpetrators stole 30 guns from this gun store.

Vandalia Range and Armory, Palmer Firearms, and the Miami Armory, Dayton, August 2015101

A team of perpetrators burglarized three gun stores during a four-day period, stealing a total of 77 guns.

OKLAHOMA

Tulsa Firearms, Tulsa, September 2011102

An unknown number of perpetrators stole 26 guns from this store.

OREGON

Advanced Firearms Training, Gresham, April 2017103 

Four revolvers, two semi-automatic handguns, and one AR-15 assault rifle were stolen by a perpetrator from this gun store.

PENNSYLVANIA

R&J Welch, Muncy, February 2017104

Eleven handguns were stolen during a burglary of this gun store.

Arrowhead Outdoors, GNR Sporting Goods, and Fulmer’s Sporting Goods, north-central Pennsylvania, May–June 2016105

A pair of perpetrators burglarized three gun stores during a two-month period, stealing a total of 93 guns.

Walmart, Waynesboro, October 2015106

A pair of perpetrators stole five rifles during two separate robberies of this store.

Delaware Valley Sports Center, Bustleton, June 2014107

Two perpetrators stole seven firearms and critically wounded one person in a robbery of this gun store.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Five Star Gun, Longs, October 2016108

An unknown number of perpetrators stole 229 firearms from this gun store during Hurricane Matthew.

SOUTH DAKOTA

The Rooster Store, Rapid City, April 2016109

An unknown number of perpetrators stole 25 guns from this gun shop, three of which were later connected to a homicide and a police shooting in Denver. 

TENNESSEE

The Tactical Edge, Clarksville, June 2017110  

An unknown number of perpetrators conducted a smash-and-grab robbery and stole 45 handguns and rifles from this gun store, marking the first of two gun store robberies in this area in two weeks.

Guns and Ammo, Mount Juliet, June 2017111 

Thieves stole 15 handguns and a rifle from this gun store, marking the second gun store robbery in the area in a two-week span.

TEXAS

R&G Guns, Alvin, May 2017112

A group of perpetrators used a stolen truck to pull the door off of this gun store, then stole more than a dozen guns.

Shooter’s Edge, Waxahachie, July 2016113

Perpetrators drove a stolen truck through the brick wall of this gun store, then stole multiple guns. 

Webyshops, Arlington, April 2016114

A pair of perpetrators broke into this outdoor sports store and stole more than 50 guns.

Carter’s Country Guns and Ammo, Houston, March 2016115

A group of roughly 10 perpetrators stole more than 50 firearms during a burglary of this gun store.

UTAH

Flawless Firearms, West Jordan, November 2016116

Two thieves stole nine firearms, including two machine guns, from this gun shop.

VERMONT

R&L Archery, Barre, March 2015117

A perpetrator broke into this gun store and stole 12 handguns from a display case, then drove to Hartford, Connecticut, and traded the guns to a drug dealer in exchange for heroin and cocaine.

Rite Way Sports Shop, Hardwick, April 2014118

Thirty-two guns were stolen during a burglary of this gun store.

VIRGINIA

50 West Armory, A.S.H. Tactical, and SSG Tactical, Chantilly and Fredericksburg, March 2017119

Three perpetrators robbed three gun stores over a four-day period, stealing more than 35 semi-automatic handguns.

Gail’s Bait & Tackle, Chesapeake, November 2016 and January 2017120

A perpetrator broke into this gun store on two separate occasions and stole a total of four rifles.

TNT Outfitters, Appomattox, January 2016121

Four perpetrators burglarized this gun store and stole 56 firearms.

WASHINGTON

Federal Way Indoor Range LLC, Federal Way, January 2017 122

Four thieves store 31 firearms from a gun range during this burglary.

WEST VIRGINIA

Sportsmen’s Gun and Pawn, Barboursville, May 2017123

An unspecified number of thieves stole more than 100 firearms from this gun store.

WISCONSIN

Armageddon Supplies, Janesville, April 2017124

An anti-government extremist used a hammer to break through the front windows of this gun store; stole 18 guns, two silencers, and ammunition; then led authorities on a manhunt. The store had been burglarized less than a year prior to this incident.

Jon’s Gun Shop, Oshkosh, May 2015125

Eleven semi-automatic guns were stolen during a burglary of this gun store.

WYOMING

Dragoon Armory, Cheyenne, May 2017126

Three perpetrators broke into this gun store and stole an unspecified number of firearms.

About the authors

Chelsea Parsons is the vice president of Guns and Crime Policy at the Center for American Progress. Her work focuses on advocating for progressive laws and policies relating to gun violence prevention and the criminal justice system at the federal, state, and local levels. In this role, she has helped develop measures to strengthen gun laws and reduce gun violence that have been included in federal and state legislation and as part of then-President Barack Obama’s January 2016 executive action announcement on gun violence prevention. Prior to joining the Center, Parsons was general counsel to the New York City criminal justice coordinator, a role in which she helped develop and implement criminal justice initiatives and legislation in areas including human trafficking, sexual assault, family violence, firearms, identity theft, indigent defense, and justice system improvements. She previously served as an assistant New York state attorney general and a staff attorney clerk for the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Eugenio Weigend Vargas is the senior policy analyst for the Guns and Crime Policy team at the Center. His work has focused on public security. He has conducted research on arms trafficking, organized crime and violence, firearm regulations in the United States, and the illegal flow of weapons to Mexico. He has a Ph.D. from Tecnológico de Monterrey and a master’s degree in public affairs from Brown University.

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank Daniel Berkson for research assistance for this report.

Endnotes

  1. Keith Allen, Jessica Suerth, and Eric Levenson, “New York Police Officer Fatally Shot in ‘Unprovoked Attack,’” CNN, July 5, 2017, available at http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/05/us/nypd-officer-shooting/index.html.
  2. Associated Press, “Police: UPS Shooter in San Francisco Armed With Stolen Guns,” Fox News, June 24, 2017, available at http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/06/24/police-ups-shooter-in-san-francisco-armed-with-stolen-guns.html; Aaron Pero, “Police: UPS Shooter in San Francisco Armed With Stolen Guns,” KRON4, June 24, 2017, available at http://kron4.com/2017/06/23/san-francisco-police-provide-new-information-on-ups-shooting.
  3. Authors’ analysis of data from Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2015 (U.S. Department of Justice, 2017), available at https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/36792; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2014 (U.S. Department of Justice, 2016), available at http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACJD/studies/36392; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2013 (U.S. Department of Justice, 2015), available at http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACJD/studies/36123; and Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2012 (U.S. Department of Justice, 2014), available at http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACJD/studies/35022. In order to estimate the number of firearms based on the value of stolen guns, the authors used an average price of $450 for every stolen gun. Using this figure results in approximately 300,000 guns stolen each year, which is consistent with findings from David Hemenway and others, “Whose guns are stolen? The epidemiology of Gun theft victims” Injury Epidemiology 4 (11) (2017): 1–5, available at https://injepijournal.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40621-017-0109-8.
  4. This includes burglaries, robberies, and larcenies. Center for American Progress analysis of U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Federal Firearms Licensee Statistics Theft/Loss Reports 2012-2016” (U.S. Department of Justice, 2017), available at https://www.atf.gov/resource-center/data-statistics.
  5. Authors’ analysis of data from Center for American Progress analysis of U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Federal Firearms Licensee Statistics Theft/Loss Reports 2012-2016;” Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2015; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2014; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2013; and Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2012. The authors considered data on guns stolen from FFLs and private owners during the period from 2012 to 2015 to use a consistent time period for both data sets and did not include guns lost from the inventory of FFLs.
  6.  The average rate of the five states with the highest rates is 220 per every 100,000 people. The average rate of the five states with the lowest rates is 16 per every 100,000 people. The authors used population data reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2015; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2014; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2013; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2012.
  7. The average rate of the five states with the highest rates is 125 per every 1,000 gun stores. The average rate of the five states with the lowest rates is 7 per every 1,000 gun stores. This includes burglaries, robberies, and larcenies. To estimate the rates, the authors used the number of dealers with a federal firearms license (FFL), reported by ATF during December 2016 as base. Center for American Progress analysis of U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Federal Firearms Licensee Statistics Theft/Loss Reports 2012-2016.
  8. Center for American Progress analysis of U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, FFL Theft/Loss Reports Matching Firearms Subsequently Recovered and Traced (U.S. Department of Justice, 2014), available at https://www.atf.gov/about/firearms-trace-data-2015; U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, FFL Theft/Loss Reports Matching Firearms Subsequently Recovered and Traced (U.S. Department of Justice, 2013), available at https://www.atf.gov/about/firearms-trace-data-2015; U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, FFL Theft/Loss Reports Matching Firearms Subsequently Recovered and Traced (U.S. Department of Justice, 2012), available at https://www.atf.gov/about/firearms-trace-data-2015; U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, FFL Theft/Loss Reports Matching Firearms Subsequently Recovered and Traced (U.S. Department of Justice, 2011), available at https://www.atf.gov/about/firearms-trace-data-2015; U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, FFL Theft/Loss Reports Matching Firearms Subsequently Recovered and Traced (U.S. Department of Justice, 2010), available at https://www.atf.gov/about/firearms-trace-data-2015.
  9. Marc Perrusquia, “Stolen Guns: ‘Getting Them Is the Easy Part,’” The Commercial Appeal, June 27, 2017, available at http://projects.commercialappeal.com/woundedcity/stolen-guns-this-fence-makes-a-bad-neighbor.php.
  10. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Congressional Budget Submission: Fiscal Year 2018 (U.S. Department of Justice, 2017), p. 12, available at https://www.justice.gov/file/968946/download.
  11. U.S. Department of the Treasury and U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Following the Gun: Enforcing Federal Laws Against Firearms Traffickers (2000), p. 11, table 2, available at http://everytown.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Following-the-Gun_Enforcing-Federal-Laws-Against-Firearms-Traffickers.pdf.
  12. Ibid., p. 13, table 3.
  13. Anthony Fabio and others, “Gaps Continue in Firearm Surveillance: Evidence From a Large U.S. City Bureau of Police,” Journal of Social Medicine 10 (1) (2016): 13–21, available at http://www.socialmedicine.info/index.php/socialmedicine/article/view/852/1649.
  14. Center for American Progress analysis of U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Federal Firearms Licensees (FFL) Burglary and Robbery Statistics – Calendar Year 2012-2016,” available at https://www.atf.gov/resource-center/federal-firearms-licensees-ffl-burglary-and-robbery-statistics-calendar-year-2012.
  15. This includes burglaries, robberies, and larcenies. Center for American Progress analysis of U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Federal Firearms Licensee Statistics Theft/Loss Reports 2012 -2016.
  16. Authors’ analysis of data from Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2015.
  17. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Firearms Stolen During Household Burglaries and Other Property Crimes, 2005–2010 (U.S. Department of Justice, 2012), available at https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/fshbopc0510.pdf; David Hemenway, Deborah Azrael, and Matthew Miller, “Whose Guns Are Stolen? The Epidemiology of Gun Theft Victims” Injury Epidemiology 4 (11) (2017): 1–5, available at https://injepijournal.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40621-017-0109-8.
  18. Hemenway, Azrael, and Miller, “Whose Guns Are Stolen?”
  19. Ibid.
  20. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reports: Property Stolen and Recovered 2015, (2015) available at https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2015/crime-in-the-u.s.-2015/tables/table-24.
  21. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reports: Property Stolen and Recovered 2015, (2015) available at https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2015/crime-in-the-u.s.-2015/tables/table-24.; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2014; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2013; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2012. The authors aggregated the monthly data reported by the agencies to arrive at annual figures for the value of stolen firearms and the value of recovered firearms for each state, then subtracted the recovered value to obtain the adjusted value of stolen firearms for each state. While some agencies did not report these values, the clear majority of agencies did report these figures. Nonetheless, agencies from New Jersey did not report any information, and only one agency in Illinois reported these values. Therefore, the authors did not include these states in this analysis. The authors also compared these values reported under the Uniform Crime Reporting Program to those reported by states, although not all states reported this information. While there were some small discrepancies in values, the figures are consistent and highly associated with figures from the Uniform Crime Reporting Program. These reports may also include the value of some firearms stolen from licensed gun dealers in addition to reports of firearms stolen from individual gun owners. When comparing these data to the number of guns reported stolen from gun dealers by the ATF, the authors are confident that these data primarily reflect the value of firearms stolen from individual gun owners and any value of firearms reported stolen from gun dealers that may be included is only de minimis.
  22. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, “About 1.4 Million Guns Stolen During Household Burglaries and Other Property Crimes From 2005 to 2010,” Press release, November 8, 2012, available at https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/press/fshbopc0510pr.cfm. This source indicated that, on average, the value of stolen firearms—in those cases when only a firearm was stolen—was between $400 and $500 per incident from 2005 to 2010. To estimate the number of firearms stolen, the authors considered these figures and used a middle point, $450. Using this figure results in around 300,000 guns stolen nationwide each year. This is consistent with findings from Hemenway and others, “Whose guns are stolen? The epidemiology of Gun theft victims.”
  23. According to information from the U.S. Census Bureau, both states have populations close to 10 million people. However, the authors estimated that close to 65,000 guns were stolen from Georgia between 2012 and 2015. This figure is 3 times higher than the estimated number of guns stolen from Michigan during that period—close to 23,000 firearms. It is important to highlight that some discrepancies can be attributed to more agencies reporting in one state in comparison with the other. Despite this possibility, however, the differences are significant.
  24. While Massachusetts and Tennessee have similar populations—around 6.5 million—they show remarkable differences in the estimated number of firearms stolen. While 2,500 firearms were stolen in Massachusetts between 2012 and 2015, almost 24 times as many were stolen from Tennessee—close to 62,000 guns. As above, some discrepancies can be attributed to more agencies reporting in one state in comparison with the other. Despite this, however, the differences are significant.
  25. Center for American Progress analysis of Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2015; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2014; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2013; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Property Stolen and Recovered, 2012.
  26. Ibid.
  27. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Congressional Budget Submission.
  28. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “ATF fflAlert,” available at https://www.atf.gov/firearms/docs/undefined/fflalertspecialnoticetofflsofficialpdf/download; Alex Yablon, “ATF Upgrades Alert System for Gun-Store Thefts,” The Trace, June 27, 2017, available at https://www.thetrace.org/2017/06/atf-upgrades-alert-system-gun-store-thefts.
  29. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, ATF Safety and Security Information for Federal Firearms Licensees (U.S. Department of Justice, 2010), available at https://www.atf.gov/firearms/docs/guide/safety-and-security-information-federal-firearms-licensees-atf-p-33172/download; U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Loss Prevention for Firearms Retailers (U.S. Department of Justice, 2016), available at https://www.atf.gov/firearms/docs/guide/loss-prevention-firearms-retailers/download.
  30. John Bocker, “Security Basics: How to Criminal-Proof a Gun Store or Shooting Range,” National Shooting Sports Foundation, June 6, 2017, available at http://www.nssfblog.com/security-basics-how-to-criminal-proof-a-gun-store-or-shooting-range.
  31. Yablon, “ATF Upgrades Alert System for Gun-Store Thefts.”
  32. Kelsey Ryan, “Barricades and Security Cameras: With More Gun Store Thefts, Owners Arm Themselves,” The Kansas City Star, April 23, 2017, available at http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/crime/article146093049.html.
  33. Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, “Dealer Regulations,” available at http://smartgunlaws.org/gun-laws/policy-areas/gun-dealer-sales/dealer-regulations.
  34. SECURE Firearm Storage Act, H. Rept. 3361, 115 Cong. 1 sess. (2017).
  35. Winnie Stachelberg, Arkadi Gerney, and Chelsea Parsons, “Blindfolded, and With One Hand Tied Behind the Back” (Washington: Center for American Progress, 2013), available at https://cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/GunRidersBrief-7.pdf.
  36. Arkadi Gerney and Chelsea Parsons, “Lost and Stolen Guns From Gun Dealers” (Washington: Center for American Progress, 2013), available at https://cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/GerneyInventoryBrief-1.pdf; Jennifer Mascia, “Only 7 Percent of Licensed Gun Dealers Were Inspected Last Year,” The Trace, October 29, 2015, available at https://www.thetrace.org/2015/10/gun-store-atf-inspection; Alex Yablon, “The ATF Inspected Fewer Gun Dealers Last Year Than at Any Time in the Past Decade” The Trace, August 12, 2016, available at https://www.thetrace.org/2016/08/atf-inspected-fewer-gun-dealers-last-year-than-any-time-in-the-past-decade.
  37. Matt Buedel, “Gun Violence Rises in Peoria as More Guns Stolen and Seized” Journal Star, June 27, 2017, available at http://www.pjstar.com/news/20170627/gun-violence-rises-in-peoria-as-more-guns-stolen-and-seized.
  38. Yolanda Jones, “As Thefts of Guns From Cars Rise, Memphis Leaders Urge Owners to Secure Firearms,” The Commercial Appeal, April 28, 2017, available at http://www.commercialappeal.com/story/news/crime/2017/04/28/thefts-guns-cars-rise-memphis-leaders-urge-owners-secure-firearms/100883556.
  39. Lena Blietz, “Gun Thefts on the Rise in Gallatin County and Nationwide,” KTVQ.com, April 19, 2017, available at http://www.ktvq.com/story/35193501/gun-thefts-on-the-rise-in-gallatin-county-and-nationwide.
  40. David Hodges, “NBC2 Investigators: Gun Theft Rising Problem in Southwest Florida,” NBC2, February 27, 2017, available at http://www.nbc-2.com/story/34618321/nbc2-investigators-gun-theft-rising-problem-in-southwest-florida.
  41. Brian Freskos, “Guns Are Stolen in America Up to Once Every Minute. Owners Who Leave Their Weapons in Cars Make It Easy for Thieves,” The Trace, December 21, 2016, available at https://www.thetrace.org/2016/09/stolen-guns-cars-trucks-us-atlanta.
  42. Jones, “As Thefts of Guns From Cars Rise, Memphis Leaders Urge Owners to Secure Firearms”; WSOC-TV, “Number of Stolen Guns on the Rise in Charlotte, Police Says,” November 10, 2015, available at http://www.wsoctv.com/news/special-reports/number-stolen-guns-rise-charlotte-police-say/26901395.
  43. Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, “Safe Storage & Gun Locks,” available at http://smartgunlaws.org/gun-laws/policy-areas/consumer-child-safety/safe-storage-gun-locks; Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, “Child Access Prevention,” available at http://smartgunlaws.org/gun-laws/policy-areas/consumer-child-safety/child-access-prevention.
  44. Blietz, “Gun Thefts on the Rise in Gallatin County and Nationwide.”
  45. Jones, “As Thefts of Guns From Cars Rise, Memphis Leaders Urge Owners to Secure Firearms”; Perrusquia, “Stolen Guns.”
  46. Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, “Reporting Lost & Stolen Firearms,” available at http://smartgunlaws.org/gun-laws/policy-areas/gun-owner-responsibilities/reporting-lost-or-stolen-firearms.
  47. Center for American Progress analysis of data from U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey Series (U.S. Department of Justice, 2015), available at https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/series/95.
  48. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Firearms Stolen During Household Burglaries and Other Property Crimes, 2005–2010.
  49. Fix Gun Checks Act of 2016, 114th Cong., 2nd sess., available at https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/senate-bill/2934.
  50. Quoctrung Bui and Margot Sanger-Kats, “How to Prevent Gun Deaths? Where Experts and the Public Agree,” The New York Times, January 10, 2017, available at https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/01/10/upshot/How-to-Prevent-Gun-Deaths-The-Views-of-Experts-and-the-Public.html.
  51. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Federal Grand Jury Indicts Birmingham Man in Tuscaloosa Gun Store Burglary,” Press release, April 28, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/federal-grand-jury-indicts-birmingham-man-tuscaloosa-gun-store-burglary.
  52. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “ATF Offers Reward in Gun Store Burglary,” Press release, March 22, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/atf-offers-reward-gun-store-burglary-7.
  53. Dave Detling, “Wasilla Gun Store Burglarized,” KTVA Alaska, March 4, 2014, available at http://www.ktva.com/wasilla-gun-store-burglarized.
  54. Jerod MacDonald-Evoy, “Police, ATF Offer Reward in Mesa Gun-Shop Burglary,” AZ Central, December 28, 2016, available at http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/mesa-breaking/2016/12/28/police-atf-offer-reward-mesa-gun-shop-burglary/95934690.
  55. Region 8 ABC, “Crimestoppers: Thieves Steal 64 Guns From Pawn Shop,” February 8, 2017, available at http://www.kait8.com/story/34451553/crimestoppers-thieves-steal-64-guns-from-pawn-shop.
  56. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Leader of Ring That Stole Dozens of Firearms During Burglaries of Southern California Gun Shops Pleads Guilty to Federal Charges,” Press release, September 13, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/leader-ring-stole-dozens-firearms-during-burglaries-southern-california-gun-shops-pleads.
  57. Rick Montanez, “Armed Men Make Off With Pillowcase Full of Guns in Fresno Firearms Robbery,” ABC 30, December 4, 2014, available at http://abc30.com/news/armed-men-make-off-with-pillowcase-full-of-guns-in-fresno-firearms-robbery/423175.
  58. Scott Harrison, “Trend of Gun Store Break-Ins Continues in Colorado,” News Channel 13, June 27, 2017, available at http://www.krdo.com/news/top-stories/trend-of-gun-store-break-ins-continues-in-colorado/566465736.
  59. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Denver Man Sentenced to Prison for Illegally Possessing Firearms Stolen From Colorado Gun Store,” Press release, February 28, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/denver-man-sentenced-prison-illegally-possessing-firearms-stolen-colorado-gun-store-0.
  60. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Third and Final Defendant Involved in Theft of Firearms From Pueblo Gun Store Sentenced to Federal Prison,” Press release, December 2, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/third-and-final-defendant-involved-theft-firearms-pueblo-gun-store-sentenced-federal-prison.
  61. Joseph Wenzel IV, “Surveillance Photos Released in Gun Store Robbery in Woodbridge,” Eyewitness News 3, July 16, 2015, available at http://www.wfsb.com/story/29352299/surveillance-photos-released-in-gun-store-robbery-in-woodbridge.
  62. Kye Parsons, “Trio Arrested in Laurel Gun Shop Robbery,” WBOC 16, February 2, 2011, available at http://www.wboc.com/story/13897486/4-arrested-in-laurel-gun-shop-robbery.
  63. Peter Bernard, “Crash and grab burglars make off with guns, ammo in Zephyrhills,” News Channel 8, April 10, 2017, available at http://wfla.com/2017/04/10/crash-and-grab-burglars-make-off-with-guns-ammo-in-zephyrhills.
  64. Lloyd Sowers, “Local Governments Limited on Stopping Gun Store Burglaries,” Fox 13, January 30, 2017, available at http://www.fox13news.com/news/local-news/232688693-story.
  65. 10News Staff, “Looters ransack Tampa gun store in smash-and-grab robbery,” 10News, November 29, 2016, available at http://www.wtsp.com/news/local/tampa-police-investigating-gun-store-break-in/357762276.
  66. Fox 13, “Weapons Stolen From Tampa Gun Store and Range,” October 22, 2015, available at http://www.fox13news.com/news/local-news/37145103-story.  
  67. WJCL 22, “55 guns stolen from Statesboro store,” June 9, 2016, available at http://www.wjcl.com/article/55-guns-stolen-from-statesboro-store/947727.
  68. WSB-TV 2, “Police: 4 Thieves Stole More Than 30 Firearms From Covington Gun Shop,” February 29, 2016, available at http://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/dozens-guns-stolen-covington-gun-store/152631622.  
  69. Star-Advertiser Staff, “Theft of 15 Handguns in Kona Burglary Triggers Call for Help,” Honolulu Star-Advertiser, January 6, 2015, available at http://www.staradvertiser.com/2015/01/06/breaking-news/theft-of-15-handguns-in-kona-burglary-triggers-call-for-help.
  70. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Plummer Man Pleads to Theft and Possession of Stolen Firearms,” Press release, November 16, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/plummer-man-pleads-theft-and-possession-stolen-firearms.
  71. Stacey Baca, “40 Guns Stolen From Oak Forest Gun Range, Police Search for 4 Suspects,” ABC 7 Eyewitness News, April 28, 2017, available at http://abc7chicago.com/news/40-guns-stolen-from-oak-forest-gun-range-police-search-for-4-suspects/1929930.
  72. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Centralia Resident Convicted on Federal Charges for Burglarizing Gun Dealer,” Press release, May 1, 2015, available at https://www.atf.gov/chicago-field-division/pr/centralia-resident-convicted-federal-charges-burglarizing-gun-dealer.
  73. Trevor Shirley, “Anderson gun store robbed for third time in 18 Months,” Fox 59, May 27, 2016, available at http://fox59.com/2016/05/27/anderson-gun-store-robbed-for-third-time-in-18-months.
  74. TheIndyChannel.com Staff, “$20,000 Reward Offered for Lawrence Gun Store Robbery,” RTV6, November 5, 2015, available at http://www.theindychannel.com/news/local-news/20000-reward-offered-for-lawrence-gun-store-robbery.
  75. The Gazette, “Cedar Rapids Police, ATF Investigate Theft at Gun Store,” June 6, 2017, available at http://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/public-safety/linn-county/cedar-rapids-police-atf-investigate-theft-at-gun-store-20170603.
  76. Matt Stewart, “Merriam Police Searching for Suspect Who Stole Thousands of Dollars of Guns From Local Store,” Fox4KC, April 13, 2017, available at http://fox4kc.com/2017/04/13/merriam-police-searching-for-suspect-who-stole-thousands-of-dollars-of-guns-from-local-store.
  77. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “ATF, Firearms Industry Offer Reward in Louisville Firearms Theft,” Press release, July 28, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/atf-firearms-industry-offer-reward-louisville-firearms-theft.
  78. Brock Sues and Chris Nakamoto, “3 Charged With Gun Store Heist,” WBRZ 2, July 16, 2015, available at http://www.wbrz.com/news/3-charged-with-gun-store-heist.
  79. Nick Sambides Jr., “16 Handguns Stolen in Bangor Pawn Shop Burglary,” Bangor Daily News, July 11, 2017, available at http://bangordailynews.com/2016/10/12/news/bangor/16-handguns-stolen-in-bangor-pawn-shop-burglary.
  80. WMAR Staff, “Police Release Surveillance Video of Gun Store Robbery,” ABC2, March 10, 2017, available at http://www.abc2news.com/news/state/police-release-surveillance-video-of-gun-store-robbery-in-rockville.
  81. Tim Prudente, “FBI Searches for Fifth Suspect in Dundalk Gun Shop Robbery,” The Baltimore Sun, August 29, 2016, available at http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/crime/bs-md-gun-shop-robbery-arrests-20160829-story.html; U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Five Baltimore Men Indicted for the Armed Robbery of a Federally Licensed Firearms Dealer,” Press release, March 9, 2017 available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/five-baltimore-men-indicted-armed-robbery-federally-licensed-firearms-dealer
  82. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Waldorf Man Sentenced to 13 Years in Prison for Stealing Guns From a Federally Licensed Firearms Dealer and Setting the Store on Fire,” Press release, May 20, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/waldorf-man-sentenced-13-years-prison-stealing-guns-federally-licensed-firearms-dealer-and.
  83. WCVB Boston, “Four Guns Stolen in Early-Morning Burglary of Tyngsborough Gun Shop,” February 16, 2016, available at http://www.wcvb.com/article/four-guns-stolen-in-early-morning-burglary-of-tyngsborough-gun-shop/8231711.
  84. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Felon Sentenced to 70 Months in Federal Prison for Possessing Firearms He Stole From a Gun Store,” Press release, July 31, 2015, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/felon-sentenced-70-months-federal-prison-possessing-firearms-he-stole-gun-store; John Agar, “Gun-Shop Thief ‘Foolish and Wrong,’ Hopes to Better Self in Prison,” MLive, July 30, 2015, available at http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2015/07/gun-shop_thief_foolish_and_wro.html.
  85. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Final Two Defendants Plead Guilty to Theft From Federally Licensed Firearms Dealer,” Press release, January 29, 2015, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/final-two-defendants-plead-guilty-theft-federally-licensed-firearms-dealer.
  86. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Three Charged in Millville Gun Shop Robbery,” Press release, January 26, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/three-charged-millville-gun-shop-robbery.
  87. Chris Thies, “Cook’s Gun Shop Robbed, Nine Guns Stolen,” WLOX, available at http://www.wlox.com/story/24489221/gun-shop-break-in.
  88. Chris Regnier, “At Least 20 Guns Stolen in Latest Gun Store Theft,” Fox 2 Now, June 28, 2017, available at http://fox2now.com/2017/06/28/at-least-20-guns-stolen-in-latest-gun-store-theft.
  89. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Billings Man Sentenced to Nine Years in Prison for Taking Guns From Sidney Store,” Press release, August 13, 2015, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/billings-man-sentenced-nine-years-prison-taking-guns-sidney-store.
  90. 1011 News, “Two Arrested in Connection to Lincoln Gun Store Burglaries,” February 6, 2017, available at http://www.1011now.com/content/news/Two-arrested-in-connection-to-Lincoln-gun-store-burglaries-412897633.html.
  91. Max Michor, “Police Investigating Burglary at North Las Vegas Gun Store,” Las Vegas Review-Journal, August 19, 2016, available at https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime/police-investigating-burglary-at-north-las-vegas-gun-store.
  92. Seacoastonline.com, “Police Searching for Suspects in Gun Store Theft,” February 5, 2016, available at http://www.seacoastonline.com/article/20160205/NEWS/160209455.
  93. Kasia Gregorczyk, “Burglars Hit Three Gun Shops in 24 Hours,” KOB 4, December 30, 2016, available at http://www.kob.com/albuquerque-news/burglars-hit-three-gun-shops-in-24-hours/4357683/.
  94. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Second Syracuse Man Pleads Guilty in Connection With Nedrow Gun Store Burglary,” Press release, April 17, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/second-syracuse-man-pleads-guilty-connection-nedrow-gun-store-burglary.
  95. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Newark Man Sentenced for Stealing 25 Firearms From Local Gun Store,” Press release, June 23, 2015, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/newark-man-sentenced-stealing-25-firearms-local-gun-store.
  96. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “ATF Seeks Public Assistance in Recovering Rifles Stolen From Clayton, N.C. Gun Store,” Press release, June 5, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/atf-seeks-public-assistance-recovering-rifles-stolen-clayton-nc-gun-store.
  97. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Suspects Arrested, Charged for Two Eastern N.C. Guns Shop Burglaries,” Press release, May 9, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/suspects-arrested-charged-two-eastern-nc-guns-shop-burglaries.
  98. Zack Nelson, “4 Arrested for Firearms Theft,” Williston Herald, September 17, 2014, available at http://www.willistonherald.com/news/arrested-for-firearm-theft/article_94575c28-3ebb-11e4-b012-ab79753081bc.html.
  99. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “ATF, Butler County Sheriff’s Office, Firearms Industry Offer Reward in Hamilton Firearms Theft,” Press release, March 17, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/atf-butler-county-sheriff%E2%80%99s-office-firearms-industry-offer-reward-hamilton-firearms-theft.
  100. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Two Felons From Warren Indicted for Stealing 30 Firearms From Gun Store,” Press release, October 5, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/two-felons-warren-indicted-stealing-30-firearms-gun-store.
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  102. NewsOn6.com, “ATF Offers Reward in Tulsa Gun Store Theft,” September 12, 2011, available at http://www.newson6.com/story/15441682/reward-offered-in-tulsa-gun-store-robbery.
  103. Jacob Dean, “Gresham Gun Store Robbed; Seven Firearms Missing,” FM News 101 KXL, available at http://www.kxl.com/gresham-gun-store-robbed-seven-firearms-missing.
  104. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Williamsport Man Indicted on Drug Charges and Stealing Eleven Handguns From Gun Store,” Press release, February 23, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/williamsport-man-indicted-drug-charges-and-stealing-eleven-handguns-gun-store.
  105. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Two New York Residents Indicted on Charges Related to Theft of Firearms From Pennsylvania Gun Stores,” Press release, June 28, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/two-new-york-residents-indicted-charges-related-theft-firearms-pennsylvania-gun-stores.
  106. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Two Maryland Residents Indicted for Conspiracy to Steal Firearms in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania,” Press release, January 20, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/two-maryland-residents-indicted-conspiracy-steal-firearms-waynesboro-pennsylvania.
  107. Morgan Zalot and Vinny Vella, “Cops: Gunman Shoots Patron, Steals 6 Firearms in Northeast Gun-Shop Robbery,” Philly.com, June 12, 2014, available at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/Cops-Gunman-shoots-clerk-steals-6-firearms-in-Northeast-gun-shop-robbery.html.
  108. Corky Siemaszko, “Thieves Steal 200 Guns From South Carolina Store During Hurricane Matthew,” NBC News, October 14, 2016, available at http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/hurricane-matthew/thieves-steal-200-guns-south-carolina-store-during-hurricane-matthew-n666506.
  109. Kirk Mitchell, “Guns Stolen From South Dakota Shop Found After Two Denver-Area Crimes,” The Denver Post, June 6, 2016, available at http://www.denverpost.com/2016/05/13/guns-stolen-from-south-dakota-shop-found-after-two-denver-area-crimes.
  110. Kara Apel, “45 Rifles, Handguns Stolen From Gun Store in Clarksville,” 4 WSMV, June 26, 2017, available at http://www.wsmv.com/story/35646038/45-rifles-handguns-stolen-from-gun-store-in-clarksville.
  111. Chuck Morris and Heather Hourigan, “2 Middle TN Gun Stores Robbed in 2 Weeks,” 4 WSMV, June 28, 2017, available at http://www.wsmv.com/story/35663771/2-middle-tn-gun-stores-robbed-in-2-weeks.
  112. Jeff Ehling, “Thieves steal semi-automatic weapons from Alvin gun shop,” ABC 13 Eyewitness News, May 10, 2017, available at http://abc13.com/news/thieves-steal-semi-automatic-weapons-from-alvin-gun-shop/1975115.
  113. Associated Press, “Stolen Truck Smashes Waxahachie Gun Store Wall, Firearms Stolen,” Star-Telegram, July 10, 2016, available at http://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/article88799502.html.
  114. WFAA Staff, “More Than 50 Weapons Stolen in Arlington Gun Store Burglary,” WFAA, April 7, 2016, available at http://www.wfaa.com/news/crime/more-than-50-weapons-stolen-in-arlington-gun-store-burglary/124886520; U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Garland Couple Sentenced in Federal Firearms Offense Case Involving Robbery of FFL in Arlington, Texas,” Press release, January 13, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/garland-couple-sentenced-federal-firearms-offense-case-involving-robbery-ffl-arlington-texas.
  115. Click2Houston, “ATF: Multiple Arrests Made in Smash-and-Grab Gun Store Robbery,” March 3, 2016, available at http://www.click2houston.com/news/surveillance-video-released-of-smash-and-grab-robbery-at-carters-country.
  116. Dora Scheidell, “ATF, West Jordan PD Offer $10,000 Reward for Information in Gun Store Burglary,” Fox 13 Salt Lake City, November 10, 2016, available at http://fox13now.com/2016/11/10/atf-west-jordan-pd-offer-10000-reward-for-information-in-gun-store-burglary.
  117. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Sean McKinnon Sentenced to 96 Months for Theft of Twelve Handguns From R&L Archery in Barre,” Press release, January 4, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/sean-mckinnon-sentenced-96-months-theft-twelve-handguns-rl-archery-barre.
  118. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Larry Garrow, Jr. Sentenced to 30 Months in Connection With Burglary of Hardwick Gun Store,” Press release, March 2, 2015, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/larry-garrow-jr-sentenced-30-months-connection-burglary-hardwick-gun-store.
  119. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Three Men Arrested and Charged With Burglaries of Firearms Dealers,” Press release, March 20, 2017, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/three-men-arrested-and-charged-burglaries-firearms-dealers.
  120. Kevin Green, “Man Indicted for Stealing Rifles From Chesapeake Stores,” WAVY.com, May 5, 2017, available at http://wavy.com/2017/05/05/man-indicted-for-stealing-rifles-from-chesapeake-stores.
  121. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Pair Pleads Guilty in Connection to Thefts From Appomattox Gun Store,” Press release, March 23, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/pair-pleads-guilty-connection-thefts-appomattox-gun-store.
  122. Q13 News Staff, “31 Guns Stolen in Federal Way Burglary; $5,000 Reward Offered,” Q13 Fox, February 3, 2017, available at http://q13fox.com/2017/02/03/31-guns-stolen-in-federal-way-burglary-5000-reward-offered
  123. Dan Klein, “Update: Reward Offered After 100+ Guns Stolen From Pawn Shop,” WSAZ 3, May 30, 2017, available at http://www.wsaz.com/content/news/WVSP-More-than-100-guns-stolen-from-gun-and-pawn-shop-422332273.html.
  124. Brittany Shannon, “Prosecutors: Joseph Jakubowski Wrote Letter, Thanking Gun Shop Owner, Reward Now $20K,” Fox 6, April 11, 2017, available at http://fox6now.com/2017/04/11/joseph-jakubowskis-stepfather-tells-the-ap-we-just-want-him-to-give-up; Alex Yablon and Brian Freskos, “Gun Store Robbed by the Wisconsin Manhunt Suspect Had Been Burglarized Before,” The Trace, April 11, 2017, available at https://www.thetrace.org/2017/04/wisconsin-manhunt-gun-store-armageddon-supplies.
  125. U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, “Appleton Man Sentenced to Ten Years in Federal Prison for Possessing Firearms Stolen From Oshkosh Gun Shop,” Press release, July 13, 2016, available at https://www.atf.gov/news/pr/appleton-man-sentenced-ten-years-federal-prison-possessing-firearms-stolen-oshkosh-gun-shop.
  126. Joy Greenwald, “Teens Arrested for Cheyenne Gun Store Burglary,” KGAB, May 31, 2017, available at http://kgab.com/teens-arrested-for-cheyenne-gun-store-burglary.

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