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The Eleventh Circuit’s Affordable Care Act Decision Cannot Be Squared With The Constitution
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The Eleventh Circuit’s Affordable Care Act Decision Cannot Be Squared With The Constitution

Ian Millhiser examines the Eleventh Circuit's decision on the Affordable Care Act.

Authors

  • Ian Millhiser

The key passage in today’s opinion striking down part of the Affordable Care Act appears on page 113, where the two judge majority explains how they will determine whether this law is constitutional:

In answering whether the federal government may exercise this asserted power to issue a mandate for Americans to purchase health insurance from private companies, we next examine a number of issues: (1) the unprecedented nature of the individual mandate; (2) whether Congress’s exercise of its commerce authority affords sufficient and meaningful limiting principles; and (3) the far-reaching implications for our federalist structure.

This is one way to evaluate whether a law is constitutional, but a better way is to ask whether the law can be squared with text of the Constitution. The Constitution provides that Congress may “regulate Commerce…among the several states,” and the very first Supreme Court decision interpreting this language made clear that this power is “plenary,” meaning that Congress may choose whatever means it wishes to regulate interstate marketplaces such as the national health care market, so long as it does not violate another textual provision of the Constitution.

The above excerpt was originally published in ThinkProgress. Click here to view the full article.

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Authors

Ian Millhiser

Senior Fellow