Center for American Progress

Contraception and the Economy Are Closely Connected
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Contraception and the Economy Are Closely Connected

Many seem to miss the fact that contraception and the economy do not live in separate realms. In fact, they are closely connected.

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Jobs, the economy, and debt—all of these are tied to access to affordable contraception. But many seem to miss the fact that contraception and the economy do not live in separate realms. In fact, they are closely connected.

Every day, couples have kitchen-table conversations about whether they can afford to have a child. If they already are parents, they talk about whether they can afford another child. Do they have health insurance? Do their jobs provide maternity or paternity leave, and is it paid or unpaid? What about sick leave? How much will child care cost? Will they need to move to a bigger home? And most basic of all: Can a woman afford the contraception she needs in order to plan her family?

As Sally Steenland and Jessica Arons explain, women cannot responsibly plan their families or their careers without access to affordable contraception. But that’s not all they need. Affordable housing, health care, and equal pay are also key to their economic security and family stability. That’s why we need to safeguard policies that protect the middle class, not shred it, as the latest House Republican budget plan aims to do.

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