Social Determinants of Health

Social determinants of health are the nonclinical factors that affect health outcomes. They include systemic racism, along with the broad categories of social and community context, education, neighborhood and environment, health care, and economic stability. The Center for American Progress’ work prioritizes social and economic policies that are critical across the social determinants of health to achieve health equity. The following publications aim to reduce health disparities and inequities and improve the nation’s health by addressing social determinants of health.

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Maximizing Federal Investments To Address Social Determinants of Health Report
A resident-in-training physician gets a high-five from a 5-year-old patient as the patient’s mother sits by at a health center in Washington, D.C.

Maximizing Federal Investments To Address Social Determinants of Health

In its response to a request for information from the Congressional Caucus for Social Determinants of Health, CAP outlined challenges in addressing the social and economic conditions that affect health and actions Congress can take to improve them.

Marquisha Johns

Alleviating Food Insecurity in the Disabled Community Report
A high school girl wearing scrubs, a face mask, and latex gloves hands a bag of food to an elderly senior sitting on her porch.

Alleviating Food Insecurity in the Disabled Community

As food insecurity worsened for the disability community during the pandemic, several disability organizations developed innovative solutions that could provide a road map toward better equity around food access.

Mia Ives-Rublee, Christine Sloane

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