Center for American Progress

RELEASE: How States Can Use the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law To Enhance Their Climate Action Efforts
Press Release

RELEASE: How States Can Use the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law To Enhance Their Climate Action Efforts

Washington, D.C. — Instead of a one-size-fits-all approach to climate action, state, local, and tribal governments can leverage custom, flexible solutions through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA)—also known as the bipartisan infrastructure law—according to a new report from the Center for American Progress.

Many of these state and local leaders had already stepped up to fill the void left by the Trump administration by taking steps to reduce emissions from the energy, transportation, buildings, natural resources, and industry sectors. Now, states can continue that leadership by deploying federal funds from the bipartisan infrastructure law to pursue climate action and push the federal government to be even more ambitious.

The report urges the Biden administration to further encourage that leadership by directly engaging with state, local, and tribal governments and uplifting their climate agendas through increased investments under the IIJA. The infrastructure law includes new and strengthened opportunities to invest in electric vehicle infrastructure, building efficiency, reconnecting communities separated by highways, bike and pedestrian safety, clean energy innovation, workforce development for disadvantaged communities, and resilient transportation. The law also includes several new programs to spur investment in the nation’s grid infrastructure.

“The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is a historic accomplishment by the Biden administration, but now it’s up to states to go the extra mile and get the highest return on investment on each dollar in this trillion-dollar law,” said Chris Chyung, campaign manager for the State House to the White House Initiative at CAP.

Read the report: “How States Can Use the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law To Enhance Their Climate Action Efforts,” by Meredith Alexander, Hannah Argento-McCurdy, Aimee Barnes, Chris Chyung, Camile Cleveland, and Diana Madson

For more information or to speak with an expert, please contact Sam Hananel at shananel@americanprogress.org.