Tom K. Wong

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Tom K. Wong

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Tom K. Wong is a senior fellow for Immigration Policy at American Progress. He recently served as an adviser to the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders under the Obama administration. Wong is also an associate professor of political science and director of the International Migration Studies minor program at the University of California, San Diego. His research focuses on the politics of immigration, citizenship, and migrant “illegality.” Wong’s research has been used by policymakers both in the United States and Mexico, as well as by organizations that serve immigrant communities. Wong and his work have been covered by The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, NPR, ABC News/Univision, Fusion, NBC News, Yahoo News, and Univision in Mexico. He is on the board of the California Immigrant Policy Center and the New American Leaders Project. Wong also consults on campaigns and elections, specializing in mobilizing low-propensity voters of color and immigrant communities.

Latest by Tom K. Wong

New DHS Policy Threatens To Undo Gains Made by DACA Recipients Article
Student immigration activists participate in a rally defending Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after they walked out from area high schools and universities, November 8, 2019, in Washington, D.C. (Getty/Alex Wong)

New DHS Policy Threatens To Undo Gains Made by DACA Recipients

DACA continues to be a major success, but the Trump administration’s newest attempt to restrict the initiative threatens this progress.

Tom K. Wong, Sanaa Abrar, Claudia Flores, 4 More Tom Jawetz, Ignacia Rodriguez Kmec, Juliana Macedo do Nascimento, Philip E. Wolgin

DACA Recipients’ Livelihoods, Families, and Sense of Security Are at Stake This November Article
A woman takes part in a New York City march against President Trump's decision to end DACA, September 2017. (Getty/Corbis News/VIEWpress/Kena Betancur)

DACA Recipients’ Livelihoods, Families, and Sense of Security Are at Stake This November

As the Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments on the fate of DACA, new results show that the initiative remains critical for recipients, their families, and the economy.

Tom K. Wong, Sanaa Abrar, Claudia Flores, 5 More Tom Jawetz, Ignacia Rodriguez Kmec, Greisa Martinez Rosas, Holly Straut-Eppsteiner, Philip E. Wolgin

Amid Legal and Political Uncertainty, DACA Remains More Important Than Ever Article
Lorena Jofre, a DACA recipient, walks her daughter to school before driving to work in Miami, Florida, February 2018. (Getty/Joe Raedle)

Amid Legal and Political Uncertainty, DACA Remains More Important Than Ever

A survey of DACA beneficiaries finds the program has had an outsize effect on participants, their families, and the U.S. economy as a whole—even as recipients face uncertainty about the future.

Tom K. Wong, Sanaa Abrar, Tom Jawetz, 4 More Ignacia Rodriguez Kmec, Patrick O’Shea, Greisa Martinez Rosas, Philip E. Wolgin

DACA Recipients’ Economic and Educational Gains Continue to Grow Article
Activists supporting Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and other immigration issues gather near Trump Tower in New York, August 2017. (AP/Craig Ruttle)

DACA Recipients’ Economic and Educational Gains Continue to Grow

According to the largest study to date, DACA recipients continue to play a critical role in the American economy, gaining higher wages, buying cars and houses, and starting businesses, benefiting the entire nation.

Tom K. Wong, Greisa Martinez Rosas, Adam Luna, 5 More Henry Manning, Adrian Reyna, Patrick O’Shea, Tom Jawetz, Philip E. Wolgin

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