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What Advanced Placement Means for the Future of American Education and Common Core
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What Advanced Placement Means for the Future of American Education and Common Core

Ulrich Boser and Max Marchitello explore the AP programs and the Common Core.

In many ways, education reform initiatives have become like boy bands from the 1990s. They’ll score one Billboard hit and then fade away into obscurity. Take something like small schools. For a while, everyone hailed the approach as the solution to all of our education woes. But within a few years, the reform strategy had been tabled as reformers moved to the next Big Thing.

But when it comes to education reform, there’s one approach that’s proved largely successful: The Advanced Placement program. The AP program is run by the College Board and allows students to earn college credit in high school. A couple decades ago, the program began with just a few schools. Over the years, growth in the program has been massive, and AP exams are being administered to millions of high schoolers around the country this week.

The above excerpt was originally published in Real Clear Education. Click here to view the full article.

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Authors

Ulrich Boser

Senior Fellow

Max Marchitello

Policy Analyst