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Moral Economy Quiz: Can You Match the Quote with Its Famous Speaker?
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Moral Economy Quiz: Can You Match the Quote with Its Famous Speaker?

Historical Figures Supported Responsible Capitalism

Catherine Woodiwiss and Alexandra Scheeler ask you to pair up historical figures and individuals with their quotes advocating for responsible capitalism.

“For what profit is it to a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul?”

— Matthew 16:26, New King James Version

Debate over what constitutes a moral economy is back. The Ryan Budget rolled out last month drew outrage and criticism from prominent faith leaders including Bishop Gene Robinson, Father Thomas Kelly, and Rabbi Jack Moline. Also last month, Goldman Sachs Executive Director Greg Smith announced his resignation from the firm with a public letter in The New York Times.

Smith isn’t the first businessman to assert that morality has an important role to play in the capitalist system, and Robinson, Kelly, and Moline are not the first religious leaders to demand an economy that works for the most vulnerable members of society. Historical figures on both sides of the political aisle, and in both the private and public sector, have advocated for responsible capitalism.

Take the quiz below and see if you can match the quote with the speaker. Click on a leader then on a quote to match them. If they’re a match, they will disappear. Keep going until you’ve matched them all. Good luck!

Catherine Woodiwiss is a Special Assistant and Alexandra Scheeler is an intern with the Faith and Progressive Policy Initiative.

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Authors

Catherine Woodiwiss

Special Assistant

Alexandra Scheeler

Special Assistant

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