Rights and Justice

Gun Violence Prevention

Our goal is to reduce gun violence by enacting strong gun laws, increasing investment in local solutions, and growing the movement dedicated to this mission.

Gun control advocates take part in a candlelight vigil to honor of the victims of the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas; Dayton, Ohio; and Chicago, Illinois outside the National Rifle Association headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia, August 2019. (Getty/Michael A. McCoy/The Washington Post)

What We're Doing

Implement strong gun policies

The United States has fallen far behind its peer nations when it comes to keeping communities safe from gun violence. We work to develop federal and state legislative and executive action strategies to reduce gun violence and save lives.

Increase oversight of the gun industry

A combination of weak laws and lack of resources has left the gun industry in the United States essentially unregulated. We work to shine a light on this problem and develop effective solutions to ensure that this industry is required to help solve the epidemic of gun violence.

Support for public health and community-based solutions

Laws alone are not enough. Reducing gun violence requires a dedicated investment in public health approaches and community-based violence intervention programs.

Build an effective national coalition

We partner with national, state, and local gun violence prevention allies and organizations to harness our collective power to make meaningful change.

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Featured Work

Latest

The Most Important Gun Violence Prevention Agency You’ve Never Heard Of Article
The ATF seal is seen. (Getty/Ted Soqui)

The Most Important Gun Violence Prevention Agency You’ve Never Heard Of

The Bureau of the Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives plays a crucial role in enforcing federal gun laws and regulating the gun industry, yet it faces a series of roadblocks to being able to work effectively.

Chelsea Parsons

Efforts to Address Gun Violence Should Not Include Increased Surveillance Article
Students view a memorial at Majory Stoneman Douglas High School on February 25, 2018, in Parkland Florida. (Getty/Giles Clarke)

Efforts to Address Gun Violence Should Not Include Increased Surveillance

Instead of protecting the rights of people with mental health disabilities, lawmakers are using the growing urgency around gun violence as a pretext to expand surveillance and criminalization.

Azza Altiraifi, Valerie Novack

The Intersection of Youth Activism and Faith-Based Values Article
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez stands with other students during the March for Our Lives rally in Washington, D.C., on March 24, 2018. (Getty/AFP/Jim Watson)

The Intersection of Youth Activism and Faith-Based Values

Young people’s involvement in faith-based activism is not new, and their work fighting for righteous causes should be supported.

Emily London, LaShawn Y. Warren

6 Ways to Reduce Gun Violence in America Article
People march after gathering at Union Park to take part in the March For Our Lives protest against gun violence, Chicago, March 2018. (Getty/Bilgin S. Sasmaz)

6 Ways to Reduce Gun Violence in America

There is no single, simple solution to reducing gun violence in this country. However, there are a number of common-sense steps that would be a great place to start—steps that could be taken right now.

Progressive Policy Wins in the Omnibus Article
The U.S. Capitol dome is framed by the flowers of a Saucer Magnolia tree, March 19, 2018. (Getty/Bill Clark)

Progressive Policy Wins in the Omnibus

Congress’ spending deal makes a number of important policy advances—although it shamefully leaves Dreamers behind.

the Center for American Progress

100 Ways, in 100 Days, that Trump Has Hurt Americans Article
President Donald Trump poses for a portrait in the Oval Office in Washington, April 2017 (AP/Andrew Harnik)

100 Ways, in 100 Days, that Trump Has Hurt Americans

Trump’s actions during his first 100 days in office have time and again benefitted corporations and the wealthy at the expense of ordinary Americans.

the Center for American Progress

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