Osub Ahmed

Associate Director, Women's Health and Rights

Close

Contact
Osub Ahmed

Name*
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Osub Ahmed is the associate director for women’s health and rights with the Women’s Initiative at American Progress. At American Progress, she focuses on federal- and state-level reproductive health policy, particularly as it relates to maternal health and other public health issues such as the intersection of women’s health and climate change.

Prior to joining American Progress, Ahmed was a program manager at the Black Women’s Health Imperative, where she managed a multistate reproductive justice program for young women at historically Black colleges and universities. Ahmed also has experience in public health and the health sciences, having worked with the U.S. Agency for International Development through the Global Health Fellows Program, consulted with the U.S. Department of State on a public health evaluation project, and worked at Massachusetts General Hospital as a health sciences researcher.

Ahmed received her Master of Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her Bachelor of Arts from Harvard University.

Latest by Osub Ahmed

What the Domestic Gag Rule Means for Title X Providers Article
An examination room is seen at a women's reproductive health center in South Florida, May 2015. (Getty/Joe Raedle)

What the Domestic Gag Rule Means for Title X Providers

As the Trump-Pence administration moves to dismantle the Title X program, four Title X providers explain what the domestic gag rule would mean for their work and their patients.

Osub Ahmed

Scott Pruitt Threatens Reproductive and Environmental Justice for Women Article
A mother and her daughter stand at a now defunct water fountain in downtown Flint, Michigan, on October 11, 2016. (Brittany Greeson/Getty)

Scott Pruitt Threatens Reproductive and Environmental Justice for Women

Throughout his tenure at the Environmental Protection Agency, Administrator Pruitt has favored polluters and corporations over reproductive health, rights, and justice—and women of color are losing out the most.

Osub Ahmed, Erin Auel, Shilpa Phadke