Advancing Racial Equity and Justice

CAP applies a racial equity lens in developing and advancing policies that root out deeply entrenched systemic racism to ensure everyone has an opportunity to thrive.

People stand before a mural honoring people of peace in a Black district in Philadelphia on September 15, 2013. (Getty/Frédéric Soltan)

What We're Doing

Closing the racial wealth gap and building an equitable economy

Centuries of government policies have systematically deprived communities of color of economic opportunity, leading to a persistent, growing racial wealth gap. CAP develops and advances policies to combat the root causes of the racial wealth gap and promote a more equitable, vibrant economy for all.

Supporting the Equitable and Just National Climate Platform

Long-standing racial and environmental injustices disproportionately expose communities of color to climate pollution. CAP develops and advocates for climate policies that ensure communities of color benefit from the transition to clean energy.

Eliminating racial disparities and strengthening health systems

Structural racism causes inequities in health systems and disparities in health outcomes. It also negatively affects numerous social determinants of health. CAP develops and furthers policies to reduce racial disparities in health and foster more accessible, affordable, and equitable health systems.

Promoting a representative, responsive, and inclusive democracy

Online disinformation and hate; white supremacist violence and rhetoric; and voter subversion and suppression undermine democracy and entrench systemic inequities. CAP develops policies to foster an effective, accountable, and representative democracy to meet the needs and improve the lives of all Americans.

By the numbers

$838K

The absolute dollar wealth gap between Black households and white households

CAP, “Eliminating the Black-White Gap Is a Generational Challenge” (2021).

75%

People of color’s exposure to fine particulate matter emitted by almost every fossil fuel source

Science Advances, “PM2.5 polluters disproportionately and systemically affect people of color in the United States” (2021).

4.1x

Hispanic or Latinos more likely to be hospitalized from COVID-19 than their white peers

CDC, “Risk for COVID-19 Infection, Hospitalization, and Death By Race/Ethnicity.”

4,939

Hate crimes in 2020 where a victim was targeted because of their race, ethnicity, or ancestry

FBI, “Hate Crime Statistics.”

Recent work

Latest

Let Black Soldiers Know The Military ‘Gets It’: Rename Bases Named After Confederate Generals In the News

Let Black Soldiers Know The Military ‘Gets It’: Rename Bases Named After Confederate Generals

As protesters and lawmakers act to remove Confederate monuments and statues from public spaces across the country, Frank Kendall argues that it is also time for the military to rename U.S. bases named for Confederate generals as a necessary first step toward addressing systemic racism.

Frank Kendall

LGBT Older People and COVID-19 In the News

LGBT Older People and COVID-19

SAGE, the Movement Advancement Project, and CAP co-author a report on how older LGBTQ adults in the United States are faring during the coronavirus pandemic.

SAGE, the Movement Advancement Project, the Center for American Progress

Letter to SEC on Corporate Transparency and Accountability and the Coronavirus Pandemic In the News

Letter to SEC on Corporate Transparency and Accountability and the Coronavirus Pandemic

Andy Green and others write a letter to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission regarding corporate accountability and transparency amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Andy Green, Tyler Gellasch, Erik Gerding, 5 More Lev Bagramian, Urska Velikonja, Rachel Curley, Renee Jones, Divya Vijay

How Immigrants Are Being Kept Out of the Coronavirus Recovery In the News

How Immigrants Are Being Kept Out of the Coronavirus Recovery

Stephanie Griffith explains how the federal response to the coronavirus pandemic has excluded small business owners in immigrant communities.

Stephanie Griffith

A Clean Slate in the Age of Coronavirus In the News

A Clean Slate in the Age of Coronavirus

Formerly incarcerated Americans are especially vulnerable to job loss amid COVID-19 and the current economic recession due to the stigma of a criminal record, and Rebecca Vallas and Sharon Dietrich argue that they deserve to have their slates wiped clean through expungement and record sealing.

Rebecca Vallas, Sharon Dietrich

Human rights lessons of the pandemic In the News

Human rights lessons of the pandemic

Elisa Massimino and Alexandra Schmitt explain how human rights violations have hindered the global response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Alexandra Schmitt, Elisa Massimino

Show More