Investing in Our Nation’s Human Capital Through Apprenticeship

Building our nation’s human capital is an important strategy to expand economic opportunity and improve mobility for workers. Apprenticeship, an effective worker training strategy that combines on-the-job training with classroom instruction, stands out as a promising way to invest in and grow our human capital and, in turn, boost productivity and wages and accelerate economic growth and competitiveness over the long term. Despite the benefits apprenticeship provides for workers and employers, it is frequently overlooked in the United States: In 2015, less than one-half of 1 percent of the nation’s workforce was engaged in an apprenticeship program.

Please join the Center for American Progress for a conversation with leading experts to discuss the barriers to expanding apprenticeship in the United States and to consider what policy solutions can be implemented to expand opportunities for workers to get in-demand skills through apprenticeship.

Welcoming remarks:
Winnie Stachelberg, Executive Vice President for External Affairs, Center for American Progress

Keynote speaker:
Former Gov. Steve Beshear (D-KY)

Featured speaker:
Cary James, first-year Inside Wireman apprentice, NECA/IBEW Local 26 JATC, Washington, DC

Featured panelists:
Jeremy Diebel, Senior Manager, Machining, MTU America Inc.
Ariane Hegewisch, Program Director, Employment and Earnings, Institute for Women’s Policy Research
Susan Helper, Carlton Professor of Economics, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University
Harry Holzer, Professor of Public Policy, McCourt School of Public Policy, Georgetown University
Portia Wu, Assistant Secretary, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor

Moderated by:
Angela Hanks, Associate Director for Workforce Development Policy, Center for American Progress

Location

Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC , 20005

Additional information

A light breakfast will be served at 9:30 a.m.