Climate Finance in the Paris Era

The Paris climate summit has focused the world’s attention on the fundamental shift in global finance flows that will be necessary to limit carbon pollution and adapt to the effects of climate change. Yet, despite welcome new finance commitments in Paris from governments and the private sector, there remains a vast shortfall in funding for clean energy, natural capital, and climate resilience.

Scaling up resilience finance is a particular priority for the regions that are most vulnerable—either geographically or economically—to the effects of climate change. Southeast Asia, for example, has faced typhoons in recent years that have intensified multilateral efforts to prevent and address climate-induced harm.

Please join the Center for American Progress for a discussion on the future of climate finance in the Paris era. Specific issues will include the influence of multilateral climate funds in the global economy; how developed countries, such as the United States and Japan, can cooperate and improve resilience in the most vulnerable regions; and how countries and multilateral efforts can work with the private sector.

Introductory remarks:
Greg Dotson, Vice President, Energy Policy, CAP

Featured panelists:
Naoko Ishii, Chairperson and CEO of the Global Environment Facility
Leonardo Martinez-Diaz, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy and Environment of the U.S. Department of the Treasury and U.S. Board Member of the Green Climate Fund
Rosalía V. De León, Undersecretary for the Department of Finance of the Philippines

Moderated by:
Gwynne Taraska, Associate Director, Energy Policy, CAP
Shiva Polefka, Policy Analyst, Oceans, CAP

Location

Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC , 20005