Center for American Progress

Why U.S. Airstrikes in Iraq Are Not a Major Strategy Change
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Why U.S. Airstrikes in Iraq Are Not a Major Strategy Change

Brian Katulis writes on U.S. airstrikes in Iraq.

Despite the frenzy over President Barack Obama’s authorization for airstrikes that began Friday, the humanitarian aid measures and the airstrikes to protect U.S. personnel in Iraq do not represent a major change in U.S. strategy for Iraq and Syria.

Much like Mr. Obama’s announcements the past two years on arming the opposition in Syria, Thursday and Friday’s actions amount to slight tactical shifts. These U.S. actions could affect important aspects of the instability in Iraq, but the follow-through will depend–heavily–on what Iraqis do for their country. Whether you deem this getting others to pull their weight or leading from behind, Mr. Obama made his position clear Thursday night: “As commander in chief, I will not allow the United States to be dragged into fighting another war in Iraq.”

The above excerpt was originally published in The Wall Street Journal. Click here to view the full article.

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Authors

 (Brian Katulis)

Brian Katulis

Senior Fellow