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The War on Medicaid Is Moving to the States

Greg Kaufmann discusses how various states are tightening requirements and limiting access to Medicaid, and how that will affect America's disenfranchised populations.

Authors

  •  (Greg Kaufmann)
    Greg Kaufmann

In the early 1960s, as the Johnson administration worked to enact Medicare and Medicaid, then-actor Ronald Reagan traveled the country as a spokesman for the American Medical Association, warning of the danger the legislation posed to the nation. “Behind it will come other federal programs that will invade every area of freedom as we have known it in this country,” he said in one widely distributed speech. “Until one day … you and I are going to spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it once was like in America when men were free.”

Reagan set the tone for a conservative war against Medicaid that is now in its 52nd year. Recent congressional proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would have reduced Medicaid enrollment by up to 15 million people, and, despite being defeated, congressional Republicans aren’t done yet: It’s likely they will attempt to gut the program during the upcoming budget debate. Meanwhile, more than half a dozen conservative governors are trying to take a hatchet to the program—at the open invitation of the Trump administration—through a vehicle known as a “Medicaid waiver.”

The above excerpt was originally published in The Nation. Click here to view the full article.

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Authors

 (Greg Kaufmann)

Greg Kaufmann

Senior Fellow