Center for American Progress

Sending nurses to work with poor moms helps kids. So why don’t we do more of it?
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Sending nurses to work with poor moms helps kids. So why don’t we do more of it?

Topher Spiro and Lanhee Chen discuss the bipartisan benefits of investing in nurse coaching programs.

Authors

  • Topher Spiro
  • Lanhee Chen

A high school senior learns that she’s pregnant — and she’s terrified. But a registered nurse comes to visit her in her home for about an hour each week during pregnancy, and every other week after birth, until the baby turns 2. The nurse advises her what to eat and not to smoke; looks around the house to advise her of any safety concerns; encourages her to read and talk to her baby; and counsels her on nutrition for herself and her baby.

This kind of support, with trained nurses coaching low-income, first-time mothers, is among the most effective interventions ever studied. Researchers have accumulated decades of evidence from randomized controlled trials — the gold standard in social science research — following participants for up to 15 years. They have consistently found that nurse coaches reduce pregnancy complications, pre-term births, infant deaths, child abuse and injury, violent crimes and substance abuse. What’s more, nurse coaches improve language development, and over the long term, cognitive and educational outcomes.

The above excerpt was originally published in The Washington Post. Click here to view the full article.

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Authors

Topher Spiro

Vice President, Health Policy; Senior Fellow

Lanhee Chen