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Jonathan D. Moreno Archives

Stop Politicizing Scientific Terminology

The ongoing stem cell research and cloning debates in Kansas highlight a new frontier in the stem cell debate: attempts to define scientific terms for political advantage. Read more here.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Wednesday, March 21, 2007

The Defining Problem

Sam Berger and Jonathan Moreno explain why altering scientific definitions for political ends is bad for both sides of the stem cell debate.

By Sam Berger and Jonathan D. Moreno | Thursday, March 1, 2007

Scaring Off Science

Embryonic stem cell opponents are scaring off a billion dollar industry with the message that Missouri isn’t hospitable to biomedical research.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Monday, February 12, 2007

Ad Hominem Ad Nauseam

While The National Review may believe that science does not justify stem cell research, they should argue that rather than attempt to downplay the research.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Wednesday, January 24, 2007

Alternative Sources of Stem Cell Truth

New white paper distorts potential of amniotic-fluid stem cells and obscures the deleterious effects of President Bush’s stem cell policy.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Thursday, January 11, 2007

It Takes All Kinds

The discovery of new sources of stem cells is great news. But it's not a reason to neglect the funding of embryonic stem cell research.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Tuesday, January 9, 2007

Third Time’s the Harm

The third attempt to overturn a stem cell initiative in Missouri could be the most damaging to both science and the state.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Wednesday, December 20, 2006

A New Type of Values Voter

The 2006 midterm election shows that the new values voters support the promise of scientific research.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Tuesday, December 19, 2006

Next Steps for Stem Cells in Congress

Enacting legislation that will remove the August 9, 2001 restriction on embryonic stem cells available for federal funding will be at the top of the new Congress’ agenda for next year. Increasing the cell lines eligible for federal research funding is part of the new Congress’ “Six for 06” platform for the first 100 days […]

By Michael Werner and Jonathan D. Moreno | Monday, November 27, 2006

The Role of Brain Research in National Defense

Neuroscience has almost surely grown faster than any other interdisciplinary area over the past decade. The Society for Neuroscience is host to one of the biggest science meetings in the world, drawing about 40,000 attendees from disciplines including neurology, psychology, computer science, radiology, and psychiatry, as well as my own field of bioethics. My fascination […]

By Jonathan D. Moreno | Tuesday, November 14, 2006

“Rush” to Judgment

Limbaugh’s outburst was the symptom of a larger disease of attacking advocates and scientists rather than debating the issues.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Thursday, November 2, 2006

Minding the Stem Cell Gap

Policies make international collaboration more difficult and cause a large amount of worldwide funding to be used on less useful lines.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Monday, October 23, 2006

Stemming and Hawing

It's time to stop worrying about appeasing opponents of stem cell research and start focusing on research into life-saving cures.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger | Monday, September 11, 2006

The Hard Cell

Obtaining stem cells from a single cell without damaging the embryo could remove primary ethical concerns from the table.

By Jonathan D. Moreno and John Gearhart | Tuesday, September 5, 2006

Jonathan D. Moreno

Jonathan D. Moreno is a Senior Fellow at American Progress and the author of several books on national security, science, and ethics, including Mind Wars: Brain Science and the Military in the 21st Century and Undue Risk: Secret State Experiments on Humans. He is the David and Lyn Silfen University Professor at the University of […]

Thursday, August 17, 2006